Projects

1968: The Whole World Was Watching Website

1968: The Whole World Was Watching is an oral history website developed in collaboration with students at South Kingstown High School.

Project Website | Detailed information

1968: The Whole World Was Watching is an educational resource for secondary school students and teachers as well as for scholarly research on the period. Members of the sophomore class at South Kingstown High School interviewed Rhode Islanders about their recollections of the year 1968. Their stories, which include the narrators' experiences of the Vietnam War, the struggle for civil rights, the assassinations of Martin Luther King, Jr. and Robert F. Kennedy as well as many more personal memories, are a living chronicle of one of the most tumultuous years in United States history.

STG was involved in several phases of the development of 1968: The Whole World Was Watching. They assisted in procuring grant funding and provided project support for research and oral history interviews at South Kingstown High School. They also designed and produced the website. The site development took place during the summer of 1998. A grant from NetTech supported the work of four students: Sara Grady, James Barnes, Joanna Epstein, and Daniel Perlin. They digitized audio tapes of all the interviews reviewed, corrected, and edited the students' transcripts and produced additional content, including a timeline, thematic pages, and a glossary linked from terms in the narratives.

1968: The Whole World Was Watching is the second oral history project that STG undertook with the teachers and students of South Kingstown High School. The first one, What did you do in the War Grandma, was turned into a website based on the collection of student essays published in a booklet. One audio file and full transcript were included as an example, to demonstrate potential. The 1968 project was planned as a digital project from the outset; students recorded their interviews, produced transcripts and stories based on transcripts, knowing that these would be presented in an online publication. The result was a rich set of materials that demonstrated how student work could form the basis of a rich and informative digital oral history project.

This project was presented extensively at schools and conferences, and generated a great deal of interest, as it was an early example of community based oral history online.

Project Details

  • Status: Complete
  • People involved: David Reville, Linda Wood (South Kingstown High School), Sharon Schmid (South Kingstown High School)
  • Departments involved: STG (Computing and Information Services)
  • Type of project: Design and methodology
  • Research Domains: Interface design, Repository development and data curation
  • Funding: Rhode Island Council for the Humanities (http://www.rihumanities.org) NetTech (Northeast Regional Technology in Education Consortium)
  • Project URL: http://www.stg.brown.edu/projects/1968/
  • Documentation: Notes about the Project

A & L Tirocchi Dressmakers Project

A website to accompany the RISD Museum exhibition, From Paris to Providence: Fashion, Art, and the Tirocchi Dressmakers' Shop 1915-1947, including scholarly essays and narrative text on fashion and social history, databases of artifacts and information about the clients and workers associated with the shop, and curricular materials for middle-school students.

Project Website | Detailed information

Anna and Laura Tirocchi were two Italian dressmakers who worked in Providence, RI during the first part of the 20th c. The contents of the Tirocchi sisters' dressmaking shop were given to the RISD Museum in 1989. The shop had been untouched since it closed in 1947 and contained haute couture garments and fabrics along with ledgers, correspondence, and other records of the art, craft, and business of fashion from the first half of the twentieth century. In January 2001, the RISD museum mounted an exhibition that showcased not only the fashions and materials, but also highlighted the collection as an unparalleled resource for understanding many wide-ranging historical issues, including Italian immigration, women as workers and consumers, and the transition from hand production of garments to ready-to-wear clothing.

STG developed an extensive web site to accompany the Rhode Island School of Design Museum's exhibition, based on a script initially drafted by Art historian Margaret Blagg Weaver. The site includes the material that formed part of the exhibition. It also contains searchable databases of business records and customer correspondence, and as well as lesson plans.

Project Details

  • Status: Complete
  • People involved: Susan Hay (External Consultant), Sara Grady (STG), David Reville (STG)
  • Departments involved: STG (Computing and Information Services)
  • Type of project: Digital scholarly resources, Design and methodology
  • Research Domains: Digital collection development, Information architecture and modeling
  • Funding: National Council for the Humanities (mainly for the RISD exhibition, but also for the website) Rhode Island Committee for the Humanities (mainly for the website)
  • Project URL: http://tirocchi.stg.brown.edu/
  • Documentation: Credits and Notes

African American Sheet Music

This collection of African-American sheet music features many songs from the heyday of antebellum black face minstrelsy in the 1850s, and chronicles the rise of African-American musical theater.

Project Website | Detailed information

Project Details

  • Status: Complete
  • People involved: Rosemary Cullen (Primary Investigator)
  • Type of project: Signature collections
  • Research Domains: Digital collection development
  • Funding: Library of Congress/Ameritech
  • Project URL: http://dl.lib.brown.edu/sheetmusic/afam/

Alcohol, Temperance & Prohibition

Brown's collections of materials on alcohol, alcoholism, temperance and prohibition are among the largest of their type in the country. This digital collection includes broadsides, sheet music, pamphlets, and government publications, providing perspective on the temperance and prohibition movements in the United States.

Project Website | Detailed information

Project Details

  • Status: Complete
  • People involved: Tovah Reis (Primary Investigator)
  • Type of project: Signature collections
  • Research Domains: Digital collection development
  • Project URL: http://dl.lib.brown.edu/temperance/

Anne S. K. Brown Military Collection (Prints, Drawings and Watercolors)

This vast collection of military artwork, from the 16th through 20th centuries, contains thousands of battle and campaign scenes, portraits, caricatures, and is part of one of the world's largest collections devoted to the study of military and naval uniforms.

Project Website | Detailed information

Project Details

  • Status: Ongoing
  • Type of project: Signature collections
  • Research Domains: Digital collection development
  • Project URL: http://dl.lib.brown.edu/askb/

Aravaipa

The Aravaipa project presents a set of primary sources documenting the Camp Grant Massacre of 1871, together with commentary and contextual information.

Project Website | Detailed information

The Aravaipa project arose out of research by Karl Jacoby on the Camp Grant Massacre of 1871, exploring the complex cultural and historical perspectives on this event through a set of primary source documents that includes letters, trial documents, interviews, newspaper articles, and transcriptions from O'odham calendar sticks. These materials were digitized, transcribed, and encoded in TEI/XML. The project integrates these archival documents with critical and contextual materials.

CDS staff digitized the primary source materials and created the metadata to permit their ingestion into the Brown digital repository. They also trained Karl Jacoby and his students in text encoding, and provided advice and consultation during the transcription and encoding process. CDS staff worked with Brown's Student Technology Assistants program to assist them in creating a project site that integrates documentary materials from the digital repository within a critical context.

Project Details

  • Status: Complete
  • People involved: Giovanna Roz (STA program), Ann Caldwell (CDS), Patrick Yott (CDS), Karl Jacoby (Faculty lead), Julia Flanders (WWP)
  • Departments involved: History
  • Type of project: Electronic publication
  • Research Domains: Electronic publishing, Repository development and data curation
  • Funding: Student Technology Assistant Summer Grant
  • Project URL: http://www.brown.edu/Research/Aravaipa/

Archaeotechnics

A software tool for documenting and examining events experienced during the process of archaeological field work.

Project Website | Detailed information

Archaeotechnics is an evolving digital interface for creatively combining and visualizing diverse media in the documentation of the material past. Archaeology deploys a range of documentary modes: narrative, data sheets, maps, plans, diagrams, photography, video and more. Archaeotechnics provides an agile and flexible digital architecture that allows archaeologists to combine such rich and diverse media for the focused recording and archiving of archaeological features, contexts and interactions.

STG created an initial prototype of a web-based tool for handling media created during a Fall 2008 excavation at the John Brown House in Providence, RI. The prototype provides access to videos, images, and formal documentation by date, context (event), and unit (pit), and offers users a virtual palette on which to arrange diverse media.

This project was initiated as a 2008 STG Faculty Grant awarded to Chris Witmore and Krysta Ryzewski of the Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World.

Project Details

Archives of the Ladd Observatory

COMING SOON. Materials from the archives of Ladd Observatory, including eclipse expedition scrapbooks, slides, and associated materials from Charles H. Smiley.

Detailed information

Project Details

  • Status: Ongoing
  • People involved: Dave Huestis, Michael Umbricht (Primary Investigator)
  • Departments involved: Ladd Observatory
  • Type of project: Digital scholarly resources
  • Research Domains: Digital collection development

Association for Computing and the Humanities Website

The original design and implementation of the Association for Computers and the Humanities web site. The site has since been updated.

Project Website | Detailed information

The Association for Computers and the Humanities (http://www.ach.org) is an international professional organization devoted to disseminating information among its membership about work in the field of humanities computing, as well as encouraging the development and dissemination of significant textual and linguistic resources and software for scholarly research.

ACHWeb was created in 1995, to replace the ACH Newsletter, a quarterly paper publication sent to members of the Association for Computers and the Humanities. The goal of ACHWeb was to provide information about the Association and its activities in particular, and about humanities computing in general. In 1999, the website underwent a phase of restructuring and redesign.

Project Details

  • Status: Completed
  • People involved: Elli Mylonas (STG), Giovanna Roz (STG)
  • Departments involved: STG (Computing and Information Services)
  • Type of project: Design and methodology
  • Research Domains: Interface design, Information architecture and modeling
  • Funding: Association for Computers and the Humanities
  • Project URL: http://www.ach.org/

Autoconversion of XML data for palmtops

As part of a demonstration of the flexibilty of XML, STG wrote some XSLT scripts to generate HTML that would display well on a palm top reader.

Project Website | Detailed information

A leading XML/SGML tool developer created a "proof-of-concept" demonstration for a client to illustrate the utility and flexibility of XML markup in processing and reusing data. A sample set of client data was marked up in XML, and auto-conversion procedures were designed that produced a wide variety of output formats on several different devices, while easily and quickly re-converting modified data to produce new output.

STG modified the developer's XSL templates for XML-to-HTML conversion so that the HTML output was optimized for the limited display capabilities of hand-held devices. Among other changes to the auto-conversion process, it was necessary to replace inaccessible entities, revise display styles, and restructure wide tables as multiple sets of column pairs. The converted data was provided to the developer pre-loaded onto various palmtops.

Project Details

  • Status: Completed
  • People involved: Paul Caton (STG), Elli Mylonas (STG), Kim Plofker (STG), Tommie Usdin (Client)
  • Departments involved: STG (Computing and Information Services)
  • Type of project: Research and consultation, Tools development
  • Research Domains: Markup theories and technologies
  • Funding: Mulberry Technologies

BAMCO: Brown Archival & Manuscript Collections Online

A collection of finding aids providing enhanced access to primary source materials in many subject areas, including: American literature, American political and diplomatic history, Rhode Island history, and women's studies. Many of the manuscript collections have been digitized with links from the finding aid to digital facsimiles of letters, photographs, or other objects.

Project Website | Detailed information

Project Details

  • Status: Ongoing
  • People involved: Jay Gaidmore (Primary Investigator)
  • Type of project: Signature collections
  • Project URL: http://dl.lib.brown.edu/bamco/

Bible Browser Web

A simple and powerful web interface that supported active browsing of the Bible in eight English versions as well as the Latin Vulgate.

Detailed information

The Bible Browser is based on a full-text search engine developed before the World Wide Web. When the Web became a viable option, Richard Goerwitz, who had developed the software, wrote a searching and browsing interface for the web. The Bible Browser made it possible to search eight English translations, as well as the Latin Vulgate by passage, word, word part, or phrase, enabling research and study that would be difficult, if not impossible, with print-based versions of the Bible. It was also possible to use regular expressions and Boolean operators in queries. The Bible Browser was designed specifically for educational use and was produced and maintained by Richard Goerwitz, who also developed the Quran Browser.

The available versions of the text were: Revised Standard Version King James Version Jerome's (Latin) Vulgate New Translation (Darby) Weymouth New Testament American Standard Version Bible in Basic English The Holy Bible (Noah Webster) Young's Literal Translation.

The Bible Browser was an early example of sophisticated text search and useful parallel text display. The code was retired when it was no longer possible to maintain it.

Project Details

  • Status: Archived
  • People involved: Richard Goerwitz (STG)
  • Departments involved: STG (Computing and Information Services)
  • Type of project: Digital scholarly resources, Tools development
  • Research Domains: Information architecture and modeling

Biblio

A bibliographic management system primarily intended for internal use.

Detailed information

The Bible Browser is based on a full-text search engine developed before the World Wide Web. When the Web became a viable option, Richard Goerwitz, who had developed the software, wrote a searching and browsing interface for the web. The Bible Browser made it possible to search eight English translations, as well as the Latin Vulgate by passage, word, word part, or phrase, enabling research and study that would be difficult, if not impossible, with print-based versions of the Bible. It was also possible to use regular expressions and Boolean operators in queries. The Bible Browser was designed specifically for educational use and was produced and maintained by Richard Goerwitz, who also developed the Quran Browser.

The available versions of the text were: Revised Standard Version King James Version Jerome's (Latin) Vulgate New Translation (Darby) Weymouth New Testament American Standard Version Bible in Basic English The Holy Bible (Noah Webster) Young's Literal Translation.

The Bible Browser was an early example of sophisticated text search and useful parallel text display. The code was retired when it was no longer possible to maintain it.

Project Details

  • Status: Ongoing
  • People involved: Clifford Wulfman (STG), Andrew Ashton (STG), James Stout (STG)
  • Type of project: Tools development, Digital scholarly resources
  • Research Domains: Metadata standards and practices

Boccaccio's Decameron

The Decameron Web was begun in 1994 as a participatory hypertext project used to teach the Decameron. In 1997, STG encoded the text of the Decameron in SGML, and delivered it via a search engine.

Detailed information

The Decameron consists of a hundred stories in Italian, told from the point of view of ten young Florentines who, in the early summer of the year 1348, had taken refuge in the countryside to escape the plague in the city. In 1994-1995, Massimo Riva, together with his graduate and undergraduate students, began to compile the Decameron Web, modeling it on the Victorian Web. His goal was to develop a teaching tool that presented the text of Boccaccio's Decameron accompanied by secondary material about the author and medieval Italy.

In 1997, the Decameron Web received an NEH grant, and STG worked with Massimo Riva and his students and project managers to enhance it. STG's primary contribution was the encoding of the Italian and English of the Decameron in SGML, and its deployment using a powerful search engine.

STG developed a DTD based on TEI-Lite for the Decameron text. STG staff encoded portions of the text and supervised further work by graduate students in the Italian Studies Department. Dynaweb 4.1 was used to deliver the SGML encoded text from the STG web server. The structural encoding permitted searching on selected structural units, such as whole text, frame, novelle. All named characters and geographic locations in the text were tagged and could be retrieved by means of an index that specified attributes relevant for scholarly research and teaching, such as gender, occupation, and social role of each named character.

STG's involvement with the Decameron Web continued and contributed to the development of further functionality, including the use of metadata to classify secondary sources and the automation of linking between the text and resource materials.

In 2001, STG offered DTD development and SGML consulting for the publication of two of Boccaccio's minor works: the Elegia di Madonna Fiammetta and the Corbaccio. Light SGML encoding was done by Vika Zafrin, Italian Studies graduate student and the text was delivered and searched from the SGML source using Dynaweb 4.1.

Since that time, the Italian and English texts have been converted from SGML to XML, and are no longer being served by the Dynaweb software. STG worked with Vika Zafrin and the staff of the Decameron Project to implement a simpler system using php and standard, open source XML software.

In 2009 and 2010, the Decameron Web was redesigned and updated to have a more contemporary look, to conform to current HTML standards, and to work with updated HTML technologies such as javascript.

Project Details

  • Status: Completed
  • People involved: Vika Zafrin (Graduate Student), Elli Mylonas (STG), Giovanna Roz (STG), Massimo Riva (Primary Investigator), Michael Hemment (Project Manager), Mike Papio (Scholar)
  • Departments involved: Italian Studies
  • Type of project: Design and methodology, Digital scholarly resources
  • Research Domains: Markup theories and technologies, Information architecture and modeling
  • Funding:National Endowment for the Humanities
  • Related Links:The Decameron Web Home Page

Brown Alumnae Oral Histories

COMING SOON.

Detailed information

Project Details

  • Status: Ongoing
  • People involved: Jane Lancaster
  • Type of project: Digital scholarly resources
  • Research Domains: Repository development and data curation

Brown Daily Herald Digital Archive

A digital version of selected issues of the Brown Daily Herald (1891- ).

Project Website | Detailed information

Project Details

  • Status: Ongoing
  • People involved: Anne Wooton (Primary Investigator)
  • Type of project: Digital scholarly resources
  • Research Domains: Interface design
  • Project URL: http://dl.lib.brown.edu/dbdh/

Brown Library Olio

COMING SOON. A miscellany of Brown Library's collections.

Detailed information

Project Details

  • Status: Ongoing
  • Type of project: Digital scholarly resources
  • Research Domains: Digital collection development

Brown Portraits Collection

A digital catalogue of Brown's Portrait Collection, featuring portraits of men and women whose lives, in one way or another, have had meaning for the university. The subjects of these portraits include administrators and faculty, trustees, benefactors, and graduates. The catalogue includes biographical vignettes of the subjects and artists.

Project Website | Detailed information

Project Details

C. L. Franklin Sermons DVD

A DVD of video interviews with C. L. Franklin conducted by Jeff Titon in 1977-78.

Detailed information

This project focuses on a set of taped interviews of Rev. C. L. Franklin, conducted by Jeff Titon in Detroit, MI, during 1977-78. These tapes are believed to be the only extant videotapes of Rev. Franklin delivering any of his sermons. When completed, the project will be published as a DVD containing the videotapes, complete transcripts of all the recorded sermons, and a slideshow.

Project Details

  • Status: Ongoing
  • People involved: David Reville (STG), Jeff Titon (Faculty lead), Sara Grady (STG)
  • Departments involved: Music
  • Type of project: Electronic publication
  • Research Domains: Electronic publishing

Carriers' Addresses

A collection of carriers' addresses dating from the late 18th through the early 20th century. Illustrated with wood-engravings and decorative borders, carriers' addresses are distinctive examples of popular publishing in nineteenth century America, and represent an important resource for the study of American poetry, history and the printing arts.

Project Website | Detailed information

Project Details

  • Status: Ongoing
  • People involved: Rosemary Cullen (Primary Investigator)
  • Type of project: Signature collections
  • Research Domains: Digital collection development
  • Project URL: http://dl.lib.brown.edu/carriers/

Catalan Literature Bibliography

The Bibliografia de Literatura Catalana/Catalan Literature Bibliography is a searchable database of books by major Catalan writers from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, and the scholarly literature about them.

Project Website | Detailed information

In 1997, Enric Bou (Hispanic Studies Department, Brown University) was compiling a database of works by and about the Catalan poet Pere Gimferrer, using the EndNote application. In order to make the materials more widely accessible, and in order to enable collaborative editing of the database, STG put the database on the web.

First it was necessary to convert the EndNote file into Filemaker, and a set of scripts was written to accomplish this. For a short time, data entry continued in Filemaker, so the scripts had to be used repeatedly. Then the Tango program was used to connect to the web, and to serve out webpages with the Filemaker information embedded in them. Using the Tango interface, it was possible to handle queries on the database, and to accept submissions from collaborators in remote locations. This work was completed in 1998. Technical work on this project was performed by Robert Madeira, '98.

Since its initial phase, the project expanded to become a database of contemporary Catalan literature, and the expanding needs of the project, as well as the developing capabilities of web servers and web browsers, necessitated a move into more powerful database software and an interface redesign. Project data was transferred from a Filemaker/Tango solution to a more standard php/mysql (LAMP) implementation. The interface and the database structure were modified so as to use improved keywording and data entry capabilities that the faculty leads identified after having used the database for several years.

BUCLIB continues to grow, as more records are added by faculty and graduate students at Brown and in Spain.

In 2009, STG revisited the project, and is currently working on transferring the data once again from the php/mysql architecture to Biblio, an XML-based bibiographic management system that was developed locally, and that uses the MODS schema for bibliographic metadata.

Project Details

Catalogue of South Asian Manuscripts

A early digital catalog of the manuscripts in American Committee for South Asian Manuscripts publication, using SGML and the Dynaweb publishing platform.

Detailed information

ACSAM was founded in 1995 under the auspices of the American Oriental Society to promote the preservation and use of manuscripts of South Asian origin in North American collections. The information it compiled was disseminated in the form of print volumes. STG worked with ACSAM to develop a prototype digital Union Descriptive Catalog of several thousand South and West Asian manuscripts now in North American collections. STG and ACSAM staff developed a SGML DTD for the descriptive bibliography of South Asian manuscripts and prototyped a Web delivery system for the data using the DynaWeb application. Ongoing work on the project includes refining the DTD and experimenting with the delivery of accented and non-roman fonts on the Web and with multilingual text retrieval By 2002, it became clear that the Dynaweb publishing solution was no longer viable for this project, and that technology had advanced to the point where the ACSAM digital catalog should be moved to a newer software architecture. In September 2002, STG converted the ACSAM database to run on the Tomcat framework using JSP, refined the DTD, and took advantage of the Unicode support in modern browsers to display Sanskrit and Arabic text. The project is no longer available, and the source SGML files have been turned over to the Brown Sanskrit Digital Library.

Project Details

  • Status: Completed
  • People involved: Elli Mylonas (STG), Kim Plofker (faculty collaborator), David Pingree (Faculty lead), Paul Caton (STG)
  • Departments involved: History of Math
  • Type of project: Electronic publication, Design and methodology
  • Research Domains: Markup theories and technologies, Metadata standards and practices
  • Related Links:American Committee for South Asian Manuscripts
  • Related Links:Brown Sanskrit Digital Library

Catskills Institute

Website of the Catskills Institute, documenting the importance of the Catskills in American Jewish Life which includes a collection of ephemera (postcards, menu & rate cards, brochures, etc.

Project Website | Detailed information

The Catskills Institute website was developed by Phil Brown and his colleagues at the Catskills Institute. to disseminate information about conferences and the photographs, memorabilia and memoirs they have collected. Additionally, the site collected queries about people and places in the Catskills resort communities, as well as news of publications, films, and other events.

Phil Brown received a Scholarly Grant to make the Catskills site more interactive, sustainable and to put a selection of the Catskills materials in Brown's digital repository, making it easier to search the photographs and ephemera.

The CDI undertook to digitize over 100 objects and incorporate them into the Digital Repository.

STG redesigned the site and refactored the HTML files to make them more usable. A Drupal forum is being configured so that it's easier to post queries. The site contains links and search forms for the objects in the repository.

Project Details

  • Status: Ongoing
  • People involved: Elli Mylonas (STG), Phil Brown (Faculty lead), Kerri Hicks (STG)
  • Departments involved: Sociology
  • Type of project: Digital scholarly resources
  • Research Domains: Digital collection development, Interface design
  • Project URL:http://catskills.brown.edu/

Causal Reasoning Survey System

A constraint based survey application for use in cognitive science experiments.

Detailed information

Steve Sloman of the Department of Cognitive and Linguistic Sciences studies how people reason about cause. http://www.cog.brown.edu/People/sloman/: "Causation is special because all knowledge may be structured around our understanding of causal mechanism. Yet, causal relations cannot directly be observed and seem to require an assessment of counterfactuals, events that have not actually occurred (simplifying, if A causes B, then B wouldn't have occurred if A hadn't, even if A did occur). His ongoing research examines the viability of formal, probabilistic models of causal and counterfactual inference and induction. One focus concerns people's sensitivity to the distinction between observation and action. Through action, people can run mini-experiments that might afford causal inference." In 2001, Sloman received an STG faculty grant to write a survey system that would provide cognitive science researchers with the ability to create, manage, and administrate questionnaires (experiments) via a web interface. Questions are in the form of an initial paragraph and/or example (scenario) followed by one or more multiple-choice questions. Experiments are organized in sets (of conditions), and it is possible to add constraints to the sets, so that the same subject cannot answer more than one condition from a set, or so that a single subject is required to answer all members of a set (all conditions in a set). The questionnaires are available to be taken on the web, anonymously. Some simple checks are provided to identify and eliminate malicious answers. The questionnaires and user data are stored in a database on the Unix server, and are downloadable for analysis in Excel or another statistical package. This program provides cognitive science researchers with the ability to create, manage, and administrate questionnaires (experiments) via a web interface. Questions are in the form of an initial paragraph and/or example (scenario) followed by one or more multiple-choice questions. Experiments are organized in sets (of conditions), and it is possible to add constraints to the sets, so that the same subject cannot answer more than one condition from a set, or so that a single subject is required to answer all members of a set (all conditions in a set). The questionnaires are available to be taken on the web, anonymously. Some simple checks are provided to identify and eliminate malicious answers. The questionnaires and user data are stored in a database on the Unix server, and are downloadable for analysis in Excel or another statistical package.

Project Details

Choices Online Materials

Provides high school students with online activities to learn about topics in international affairs, public policy, and history. Part of the Choices Online project from the Choices for the 21st Century Education Program.

Project Website | Detailed information

The Choices for the 21st Century Education Program is a national education initiative based at Brown University's Watson Institute for International Studies. Choices teaching resources provide print-based materials to study moments in history. The program was already developing online resources, primarily in the form of videos, but wanted to experiment with online student activities. Choices worked with STG to create templates for online student activities. Three activities were developed, using images and text about the Iranian Revolution as a prototype: a photo essays, a newspaper reportage, and a voting exercise based on the Global Security Matrix (another Watson Institute Project). The newspaper and the photo essay are in testing, as of 2009.

Project Details

  • Status: Completed
  • People involved: Andrew Ashton (STG), Kerri Hicks (STG), Susan Graseck (Faculty lead)
  • Departments involved: Watson Institute
  • Type of project: Digital scholarly resources
  • Research Domains: Interface design
  • Project URL:http://www.choices.edu/resources/supplemental_iran.php

Chronicles of Brunonia

The "Chronicles of Brunonia" presents historical narratives of life at Brown University, spawned by the archival documents in John Hay Library and written by undergraduates. Most of the narratives here were written in creative nonfiction workshops taught by Beth Taylor in the Nonfiction Writing Program in the Department of English.

Project Website | Detailed information

The Choices for the 21st Century Education Program is a national education initiative based at Brown University's Watson Institute for International Studies. Choices teaching resources provide print-based materials to study moments in history. The program was already developing online resources, primarily in the form of videos, but wanted to experiment with online student activities. Choices worked with STG to create templates for online student activities. Three activities were developed, using images and text about the Iranian Revolution as a prototype: a photo essays, a newspaper reportage, and a voting exercise based on the Global Security Matrix (another Watson Institute Project). The newspaper and the photo essay are in testing, as of 2009.

Project Details

  • Status: Ongoing
  • People involved: Beth Taylor (Primary Investigator)
  • Departments involved: English
  • Project URL:http://dl.lib.brown.edu/cob/

Clyde Davenport

An early website incorporating music and image, about the Kentucky fiddler, Clyde Davenport.

Project Website | Detailed information

Clyde Davenport is an old-time fiddler and banjo player from south-central Kentucky. In 1990, Brown University ethnomusicologist Jeff Titon recorded music and interviews with Mr. Davenport and his family. He then created a multimedia, hypertextual, Hypercard stack with links to brief essays about Davenport's music and fellow musicians, photographs, and recordings of several of Davenport's tunes. As a demonstration of the capabilities of the Web, Geoffrey Bilder converted the Hypercard stack to HTML in 1995, including the sound and image files. STG still hosts the Clyde Davenport project as a website. This is an example of a very early web project.

Project Details

  • Status: Completed
  • People involved: Geoffrey Bilder (STG), Jeff Titon (Faculty lead)
  • Departments involved: Music
  • Type of project: Digital scholarly resources
  • Research Domains: Digital collection development
  • Project URL:http://www.stg.brown.edu/projects/davenport/

Consultation on E-journal of Portuguese History

STG provided consulting to help department staff produce a new e-journal efficiently and using best practices.

Detailed information

Onesimo Almeida is on the editorial board of an electronic journal of Portuguese history that is a collaborative effort between Brown and the University of Porto. Most of the editorial work takes place in Portugal, and the site is hosted at Brown. As the first few issues of the journal were published, staff at Brown consulted with STG in order to streamline the production work for the journal.

In the planning stages of the e-journal of Portuguese History, STG participated in discussions about what Brown could easily host, and advised on the process of converting the submitted MS Word files to HTML and PDF. The journal, hosted at Brown, began publication in Summer of 2003. STG provided support and consulting to the staff of Portuguese and Brazilian Studies about how to make the production process more efficient.

Project Details

  • Status: Completed
  • People involved: Kerri Hicks (STG), Onesimo Almeida (Faculty lead)
  • Departments involved: Portuguese and Brazilian Studies
  • Type of project: Electronic publication
  • Research Domains: Electronic publishing
  • Project URL:E-journal of Portuguese History

Consultation on Interview Based Research

STG provided consulting to Lynn Davidman (Judaic Studies) to help her transcribe interviews more efficiently using voice recognition and code them using qualitative analysis software.

Detailed information

Lynn Davidman is a sociologist who bases her work on the qualitative analysis many hours of interviews. Her current (2003) research on women and Orthodox Judaism was going to amass 4,000 hours of interviews that had to be transcribed, organized and analyzed. She was interested in identifying technologies that would help her with these tasks.

STG worked with Lynn Davidman to see if she could use voice recognition software, and read the interviews into the computer as a way to facilitate data entry. We then showed her how to use NVivo qualitative analysis package to code and analyze her interviews.

Project Details

  • Status: Completed
  • People involved: Elli Mylonas (STG), Kerri Hicks (STG), Lynn Davidman (Faculty lead)
  • Departments involved: Judaic Studies
  • Type of project: Research and consultation

Consultation on Research Tools

STG consulted with Kerry Smith on using the Tinderbox program from Eastgate Systems to organize his research.

Detailed information

Kerry Smith was in the process of researching the Great Kanto Earthquake of September 1923, in Japan for his next book. He was investigating tools to help him make spatial connections across the materials he amassed, and allow him to organize things geographically. He was also interested in tools that could handle Unicode so that he would be able to write in Japanese without transliteration.

A spinoff of this project was a small database of newspaper materials in English on Japanese history for Japanese History class.

Project Details

  • Status: Completed
  • People involved: Kerri Hicks (STG), Elli Mylonas (STG), Kerry Smith (Faculty lead)
  • Departments involved: History
  • Type of project: Research and consultation
  • Research Domains: Information architecture and modeling
  • Project URL:Japan Times subject database for WWII:

Consuming Blackness Diasporically

An ethnographic project which studies musical and dance traditions across Black diaspora.

Project Website | Detailed information

Meida McNeal was a postdoctoral fellow at the Cogut Center; she was continuing her work on several projects on Black music and performance traditions.

The project has a traditional scholarly component and a performance component. McNeal planned to use several types of collaborative technology to allow scholars and performers in different locations such as Chicago, Trinidad, and Brazil to communicate, and, in her words, to "present, exchange and produce their experiences of and reflections on blackness, identity, citizenship and belonging through a virtually-mediated critical/creative exchange." STG's role was to support her as she puts the collaboration in place, by providing advice on what to use, and researching what has been learned from similar activities have at Brown and elsewhere.

Project Details

  • Status: Completed
  • People involved: Edrex Fontanilla (Instructional Technology Group), Andrew Ashton (STG), Elli Mylonas (STG), Meida Teresa McNeal (Faculty lead)
  • Departments involved: Cogut Center, Theatre Arts and Performance Studies
  • Type of project: Research and consultation
  • Research Domains: Interface design
  • Project URL:http://cbdcollaboration.wetpaint.com/
  • Related Links:Househedz wiki

Control and Freedom website

A website that accompanies Wendy Chun's book, Control and Freedom, which strives to enrich and illustrate points from the book.

Project Website | Detailed information

Wendy Chun's Control and Freedom: Power and Paranoia in the Age of Fiber Optics (MIT Press, 2006) examines the relationship of control and freedom in the way we think of networks and the internet. Chun wanted to have an electronic companion to the book which would appear when the book was published. The website consists of a limited portion of the book, provocatively presented so as to invite the reader to interact with and think about the subject matter of the book. STG, working with two students, who did the lion's share of the work, implemented a website that mirrored the structure of Control and Freedom, and presented the introduction of each chapter in a meaningful and innovative manner. Despite its use of special effects, this whole website conformed to web accessibility standards in use at the time of publication. The designer for the project was Rolando Peñate (Brown '08) and the programmer was Owen Strain (Brown '08). The project was produced in collaboration with the Student Technology Assistants Program (Brown Instructional Technology Group).

Project Details

  • Status: Completed
  • People involved: Elli Mylonas (STG), Wendy Chun (Faculty lead)
  • Departments involved: Modern Culture and Media
  • Type of project: Digital scholarly resources
  • Research Domains: Electronic publishing, New media theory
  • Project URL:http://www.controlandfreedom.net/
  • Related Links:MIT Press link

Cultural Correspondence

A digital edition of Cultural Correspondence, a critical review of popular culture, born from the collapse of the New Left and hopes for a new beginning of a social movement, intermittently published in Providence from 1975 to 1985.

Project Website | Detailed information

Project Details

Cyrillic Font Project

A program to convert Word files using a variety of Cyrillic fonts and mappings to a single mapping, so documents could be shared.

Project Website | Detailed information

STG worked with the Department of Slavic Languages to convert all course materials, which were written using MS Word, and a variety of different Cyrillic comuter fonts with different character mappings, to a single character set mapping. The department had been using Macintosh computers since 1984, but had not standardized on any one Mac font for Cyrillic characters. Department members felt that teaching materials, which are shared among faculty over time, should be standardized. STG developed a simple font converter that maps from the original character sets to a single standard character set, and that converts the Cyrillic parts of an MS Word document. It also handles the conversion of the Word binary to RTF invisibly, so the person performing the conversion doesn't have to know how to do that.This project was carried out by Eric Perkins (Brown, '05), under the supervision of Elli Mylonas.

Project Details

Digital Arts and Culture 2001 Conference

Conference held April 26-28, 2001, Brown University

Project Website | Detailed information

STG was the host for the fourth international Digital Arts & Culture Conference, held April 26-28, 2001. Spanning the theory and practice of contemporary digital arts and culture, this conference brought together scholars, artists, researchers, and computer professionals. Previous conferences had been held in Bergen, Norway, and in Atlanta, Georgia. David Reville, Elli Mylonas, and Julia Flanders were the conference co-chairs, and STG Visiting Scholar Espen Aarseth (who founded the conference) was Program Chair. The conference web site was produced by Claire Iltis (Brown '02).

Project Details

  • Status: Archived
  • People involved: Julia Flanders (STG), Elli Mylonas (STG), David Reville (STG)
  • Departments involved: STG (Computing and Information Services)
  • Type of project: Events and outreach
  • Research Domains: New media theory
  • Project URL:http://www.stg.brown.edu/conferences/DAC/

Educating Change

Powerfully illustrated through the lives of three Mexican/Chicana women - Ramona Medina, Socorro Gomez-Potter, and Yolanda Almaraz-Esquivel - Educating Change documents a history of Mexican women's migration and activism, and considers its relevance for today's US Latino communities, including Providence.

Project Website | Detailed information

STG was the host for the fourth international Digital Arts & Culture Conference, held April 26-28, 2001. Spanning the theory and practice of contemporary digital arts and culture, this conference brought together scholars, artists, researchers, and computer professionals. Previous conferences had been held in Bergen, Norway, and in Atlanta, Georgia. David Reville, Elli Mylonas, and Julia Flanders were the conference co-chairs, and STG Visiting Scholar Espen Aarseth (who founded the conference) was Program Chair. The conference web site was produced by Claire Iltis (Brown '02).

Project Details

Emergency Medical Curriculum Website

Online curricular material for the Emergency Medicine Residency program.

Detailed information

The Emergency Medicine faculty at Brown University was an early adopter of the WWW for instructional purposes. The directors of the program wanted to put as much shared curricular material as possible online, for their own residents as well as for emergency medicine residents and program directors across the US, as this material is standardized. It was necessary for the system updated easily, as the material had to be updated frequently. At the time that this project was carried out, most websites did not have extensive cgi facilities, or online databases. So STG developed a set of scripts that would generate the website's static pages from material submitted in a standard form. The technical work on the website was carried out by Eric Perkins (Brown '04) and Da Woon Jung (MS '05). After the website was completed, the project leads asked STG to create a standalone CD-ROM that duplicated the material on the website for use by CORD, the Council of Residency Directors in Emergency Medicine. This part of the project was begun by Julian Richards and completed by David Reville. In 2002, CORD realized that the content of the website had become outdated, and asked us to take it offline. CORD has developed a new version which they will host on their own site.

Project Details

  • Status: Completed
  • People involved: Elli Mylonas (STG), David Reville (STG)
  • Departments involved: Emergency Medicine, Warren Alpert Medical School
  • Type of project: Digital scholarly resources
  • Research Domains: Interface design

Farnham

Exhibit materials

Detailed information

Project Details

  • Status: Ongoing
  • People involved: Amanda Murray
  • Type of project: Digital scholarly resources

Flatland

Thomas Banchoff's impressive collection of information about Edwin Abbott Abbott, the author of the Victorian novel Flatland. Including editions, letters and images of Abbott, a bibliography, essays.

Project Website | Detailed information

Project Details

Florentine Renaissance Resources: Online Catasto of 1427 Database

Database of renaissance Florentine tax data.

Project Website | Detailed information

The Online Catasto of 1427 is a web-searchable version of tax data for the city of Florence in 1427-29 based on David Herlihy and Christiane Klapisch-Zuber, Census and Property Survey of Florentine Dominions in the Province of Tuscany, 1427-1480. The Online Catasto provides the same information that is contained in the print volumes currently in the Archivio di Stato in Florence, but adds some variables that are not present in those volumes. As an early example of the capabilities of the WWW, Geoffrey Bilder converted the existing data of the Florentine Catasto from David Herlihy's original database files into Sybase, and developed a web-based search capability that provided for complex queries and statistical views of tax data, households, occupations, and assets. In 1999, Burr Litchfield and Anthony Molho were awarded an NEH grant to clean up, supplement and publish more of Herlihy's original research. When the work of supplementing and checking the additional information was complete, STG worked with Litchfield to publish the new data, structuring a database and developing an interface for the new materials. STG also consulted with Litchfield on an ongoing basis about the former and future formatting and organization of the new information.

Project Details

  • Status: Completed
  • People involved: Elli Mylonas (STG), Geoffrey Bilder (STG), Anthony Molho (Faculty lead), Carole Mah (STG), R. Burr Litchfield (Faculty lead)
  • Departments involved: History
  • Type of project: Digital scholarly resources
  • Research Domains: Information architecture and modeling, Interface design
  • Funding: NEH PA-23264-99 ($70,420)
  • Project URL:http://www.stg.brown.edu/projects/catasto

Florentine Renaissance Resources: Online Tratte of Office Holders 1282-1532

The Tratte is a database of office holders and candidates for office in Renaissance Florence (1282-1532). Used together with the Online Catasto, it can be mined for information about population, income and political office.

Project Website | Detailed information

This site gives access to a data base with information about office holders of the Florentine Republic during its 250-year history (1282-1532). It was developed initially by David Herlihy at Harvard and Brown Universities, and then completed in 2001 under the direction of R. Burr Litchfield and Anthony Molho at Brown with support from the National Endowment for the Humanities, Division of Preservation and Access. Following up on and extending work done for the Online Catasto, STG collaborated with Litchfield to publish the Tratte data, comprising over 81,000 records. This work included designing and implementing a new database and developing an interface for the new data. During the course of the grant new materials were found in the archives in Florence and were added to the existing Tratte records. In 2002, STG worked with Burr Litchfield under an STG faculty grant, to add supplementary materials to the Tratte database, and to finetune the interface to the existing databases, taking into account what we learned from several years of use and user experience.

Project Details

  • Status: Completed
  • People involved: R. Burr Litchfield (Faculty lead), Carole Mah (STG), Elli Mylonas (STG), Anthony Molho (Faculty lead)
  • Departments involved: History
  • Type of project: Digital scholarly resources, Design and methodology
  • Research Domains: Digital collection development
  • Funding: This project has had several phases. It received initial funding through NEH PA-23264-99 ($70,420), and was completed as part of an STG Faculty Grant.
  • Project URL:http://www.stg.brown.edu/projects/tratte/

Fox Point Project

Oral histories, transcripts, photos, and other materials related to Fox Point, Providence, RI.

Project Website | Detailed information

This site gives access to a data base with information about office holders of the Florentine Republic during its 250-year history (1282-1532). It was developed initially by David Herlihy at Harvard and Brown Universities, and then completed in 2001 under the direction of R. Burr Litchfield and Anthony Molho at Brown with support from the National Endowment for the Humanities, Division of Preservation and Access. Following up on and extending work done for the Online Catasto, STG collaborated with Litchfield to publish the Tratte data, comprising over 81,000 records. This work included designing and implementing a new database and developing an interface for the new data. During the course of the grant new materials were found in the archives in Florence and were added to the existing Tratte records. In 2002, STG worked with Burr Litchfield under an STG faculty grant, to add supplementary materials to the Tratte database, and to finetune the interface to the existing databases, taking into account what we learned from several years of use and user experience.

Project Details

Freedom Now! An Archival Project of Tougaloo College and Brown University

Archival material and essays about the Civil Rights Movement and the Brown/Tougaloo relationship, collected and presented by students from Brown and Tougaloo.

Project Website | Detailed information

During 2002, Susan Smulyan and James Campbell, together with students and colleagues at Brown and its sister school Tougaloo College did research in the Tougaloo archives to gather materials documenting the Civil Rights movement. This lead to further student research in both the Brown and Tougaloo archives exploring the relationship between the two schools. The faculty and students felt that the best way to publish this research was in digital form, so as to reach the widest possible audience. The projects were designed to be digital from their inception. Materials were scanned as soon as they were selected, and the students created metadata records for each piece of evidence. They also wrote topic essays to contextualize and explain the materials they had collected. STG worked with the faculty and students to determine a metadata information model, and to design metadata templates for the source materials. STG then implemented the Freedom Now! website, which includes the topic essays written by the students, and the underlying database.

Project Details

  • Status: Completed
  • People involved: Kerri Hicks (STG), Julia Flanders (STG)
  • Departments involved: American Civilization, Africana Studies
  • Type of project: Digital scholarly resources
  • Research Domains: Metadata standards and practices, Digital collection development
  • Project URL:http://www.stg.brown.edu/projects/FreedomNow/

Garibaldi Panorama: Visualizing the Risorgimento

A mid-19th century panorama painted in England, and illustrations from British, French, and German newspapers (c. 1850-1885) regarding Giuseppe Garibaldi (1807-1882), the military leader of the Italian Risorgimento, and his career. The Garibaldi Panorama and the Risorgimento project provides a comprehensive resource for the interdisciplinary study and teaching of the life and deeds of one of the protagonists of the Italian unification process, reconstructed with the help of newsprint and other textual and visual materials from special collections at Brown University Library.

Project Website | Detailed information

During 2002, Susan Smulyan and James Campbell, together with students and colleagues at Brown and its sister school Tougaloo College did research in the Tougaloo archives to gather materials documenting the Civil Rights movement. This lead to further student research in both the Brown and Tougaloo archives exploring the relationship between the two schools. The faculty and students felt that the best way to publish this research was in digital form, so as to reach the widest possible audience. The projects were designed to be digital from their inception. Materials were scanned as soon as they were selected, and the students created metadata records for each piece of evidence. They also wrote topic essays to contextualize and explain the materials they had collected. STG worked with the faculty and students to determine a metadata information model, and to design metadata templates for the source materials. STG then implemented the Freedom Now! website, which includes the topic essays written by the students, and the underlying database.

Project Details

  • Status: Ongoing
  • People involved: Peter Harrington (Curator), Massimo Riva (Faculty lead)
  • Departments involved: Italian Studies, Library (Special Collections)
  • Project URL:http://dl.lib.brown.edu/garibaldi/

Gorham Collection

The Brown University Library has been awarded an IMLS National Leadership planning grant for the purpose of collaborating with the RISD Library and the RISD Museum in the development of a new database architecture that will allow users to explore the complete extent of the design process used by the Gorham Manufacturing Company to create its hand-crafted consumer silver products. Once completed, the new database will initially be populated with drawings, sketches, and digital objects pertaining to Gorham’s Martelé line, a product that was entirely handmade and unique to the Gorham Manufacturing Company. Brown will work in conjunction with both the Museum and the Library of the Rhode Island School of Design to design the digital collection, which will draw on collections of Gorham silverware held by museums from around the world. Staff members will create a website to house archival drawings, sketches, and product descriptions based on catalogues produced by Gorham Manufacturing and held by the Brown Library. Users will be able to identify their own pieces and contribute their own descriptions of their personal holdings to the virtual catalogue, thereby leading to a fuller understanding of Gorham and, by extension, American manufacturing.

Project Website | Detailed information

The Brown University Library has been awarded an IMLS National Leadership planning grant for the purpose of collaborating with the RISD Library and the RISD Museum in the development of a new database architecture that will allow users to explore the complete extent of the design process used by the Gorham Manufacturing Company to create its hand-crafted consumer silver products. Once completed, the new database will initially be populated with drawings, sketches, and digital objects pertaining to Gorham’s Martelé line, a product that was entirely handmade and unique to the Gorham Manufacturing Company. Brown will work in conjunction with both the Museum and the Library of the Rhode Island School of Design to design the digital collection, which will draw on collections of Gorham silverware held by museums from around the world. Staff members will create a website to house archival drawings, sketches, and product descriptions based on catalogues produced by Gorham Manufacturing and held by the Brown Library. Users will be able to identify their own pieces and contribute their own descriptions of their personal holdings to the virtual catalogue, thereby leading to a fuller understanding of Gorham and, by extension, American manufacturing. Detailed information about the Gorham Collection can be found at the Project URL below. Digitized images from the collection can also be searched in the Brown Digital Repository.

Project Details

Great Kanto Earthquake of 1923

The Reynolds family, traveling aboard the steamship "Taiyo Maru," survive a tsunami and arrive on the scene of the 1923 Kanto earthquake disaster. This project, done in collaboration with students of Modern Japanese History, features photographs and ephemera, documents the destruction to Yokohama, and serves as a unique travelogue.

Project Website | Detailed information

Project Details

  • Status: Completed
  • People involved: Kerry Smith (Faculty lead)
  • Departments involved: History
  • Research Domains: Digital collection development
  • Project URL:http://dl.lib.brown.edu/kanto/

H. W. Sheridan Center for Teaching and Learning Website

The Harriet W. Sheridan Center for Teaching and Learning supports the efforts of faculty and graduate teaching assistants to provide an environment for student learning which helps each student realize his or her own best potential.

Project Website | Detailed information

STG provided consulting services to the Sheridan Center to support production and maintenance of a website that effectively conveys the educational goals of the Center. The website currently comprises informational material, two interactive workshops, on-line forms to help students sign up for consultations, a newsletter, and various publications written by members of the Center. The Sheridan Center webiste has since been redesigned.

Project Details

Harris Broadsides

A collection of broadsides from the Harris Collection of American Poetry and Plays.

Project Website | Detailed information

Project Details

Humanitarianism and War Project

The Humanitarianism and War Project reviews the experience of the international community in responding to complex emergencies around the world during the post-Cold War period.

Project Website | Detailed information

The Humanitarianism and War Project reviews the experience of the international community in responding to complex emergencies around the world during the post-Cold War period. STG collaborated with the Watson Institute to redesign and renovate an existing website. Search features and keyword indexing were added to provide access to the Project's publications and reports. Mike L. Smith, student in Modern Culture and Media (MCM), was responsible for the design and implementation of the website. The Humanitarianism and War Project is now being maintained by the Feinstein International Famine Center at Tufts University.

Project Details

  • Status: Completed
  • People involved: David Reville (STG), Giovanna Roz (STG), Laura Sadovnikoff (Watson Institute Contact), Larry Minear (Watson Institute Contact)
  • Departments involved: Watson Institute
  • Type of project: Electronic publication
  • Research Domains: Interface design
  • Project URL:http://www.reliefweb.int/rw/rwt.nsf/db900SID/NVEA-5ULKLG?OpenDocument

Hypermedia, Teaching and Technology Forum

In November 1996, STG sponsored a forum on Hypermedia, Teaching, and Technology.

Project Website | Detailed information

The forum presentations by teachers and researchers were made available on a website, along with a web-based conferencing system to facilitate continuing discussions by the wider community of interested educators.

Project Details

  • Status: Archived
  • People involved: Roger Blumberg (STG)
  • Departments involved: STG (Computing and Information Services)
  • Type of project: Events and outreach
  • Funding: NetTech, and the Education Alliance at Brown
  • Project URL:http://www.stg.brown.edu/conferences/HTT96/

Images of Brown

A collection of historical images of the University, serving as a visual record of Brown's campus life from its beginnings in the 1760s to the current day.

Project Website | Detailed information

The forum presentations by teachers and researchers were made available on a website, along with a web-based conferencing system to facilitate continuing discussions by the wider community of interested educators.

Project Details

Inscriptions of Israel/Palestine

A corpus of inscriptions in Greek, Hebrew and Latin from the area of Israel/Palestine from about 500 BCE to 500 CE.

Project Website | Detailed information

The Inscriptions of Israel/Palestine project seeks to collect and make accessible all of the previously published inscriptions (and their English translations) from the Persian period through the Islamic conquest (ca. 500 BCE - 640 CE). There are about 15,000 of these inscriptions, written primarily in Hebrew, Aramaic, Greek and Latin, by Jews, Christians, and pagans. They range from imperial declarations on monumental architecture to notices of donations in synagogues to humble names scratched on ossuaries, and include everything in between. These inscriptions are an invaluable resource for historical investigation, as they provide information that is frequently not available in the extant literary texts.

Michael Satlow began work on this project before he came to Brown University and had developed a DTD and prototype web presence for the inscriptions. At Brown, he received an STG Faculty Grant to continue development on the corpus.

In addition to providing DTD-consulting and markup strategy advice for this extensive database, STG also pioneered the use of heretofore under-utilized open source XML tools to provide a powerful, flexible web searching interface to the inscriptions and to the metadata about the inscriptions. In so doing, we had to develop strategies for dealing with storage, searching, and browser rendering of complex Unicode data. We also developed a MySQL bibliography database and a browsing and editing interface to the database that collaborators around the world can access. This resource can also serve as a valuable model for similar epigraphical projects in the future.

STG and the CDS have continued to support the IIP by providing space and consultations for students who are entering new inscriptions, and, in 2010, by completely rewriting the search and display software and redesigning the front end. Students continue to write XML files with transcriptions, translations and detailed metadata which are indexed using SOLR and served from a simplified XML output format.

Project Details

  • Status: Ongoing
  • People involved: Elli Mylonas (CDS), Carole Mah (STG), Clifford Wulfman (STG), Michael Satlow (Faculty lead), Andrew Ashton (CDS)
  • Departments involved: Center of Digital Epigraphy
  • Type of project: Digital scholarly resources, Design and methodology
  • Research Domains: Digital collection development, Information architecture and modeling
  • Project URL:http://www.stg.brown.edu/projects/Inscriptions/

Invested in Community

Brown University's Department of Music hosted the first conference on Applied Ethnomusicology. Participants from Europe and the United States discussed various ways in which Ethnomusicologists work directly in and on behalf of communities outside of academia. This project provides streaming video files of conference presentations.

Project Website | Detailed information

The Inscriptions of Israel/Palestine project seeks to collect and make accessible all of the previously published inscriptions (and their English translations) from the Persian period through the Islamic conquest (ca. 500 BCE - 640 CE). There are about 15,000 of these inscriptions, written primarily in Hebrew, Aramaic, Greek and Latin, by Jews, Christians, and pagans. They range from imperial declarations on monumental architecture to notices of donations in synagogues to humble names scratched on ossuaries, and include everything in between. These inscriptions are an invaluable resource for historical investigation, as they provide information that is frequently not available in the extant literary texts.

Michael Satlow began work on this project before he came to Brown University and had developed a DTD and prototype web presence for the inscriptions. At Brown, he received an STG Faculty Grant to continue development on the corpus.

In addition to providing DTD-consulting and markup strategy advice for this extensive database, STG also pioneered the use of heretofore under-utilized open source XML tools to provide a powerful, flexible web searching interface to the inscriptions and to the metadata about the inscriptions. In so doing, we had to develop strategies for dealing with storage, searching, and browser rendering of complex Unicode data. We also developed a MySQL bibliography database and a browsing and editing interface to the database that collaborators around the world can access. This resource can also serve as a valuable model for similar epigraphical projects in the future.

STG and the CDS have continued to support the IIP by providing space and consultations for students who are entering new inscriptions, and, in 2010, by completely rewriting the search and display software and redesigning the front end. Students continue to write XML files with transcriptions, translations and detailed metadata which are indexed using SOLR and served from a simplified XML output format.

Project Details

JCB Databases

STG supported the John Carter Brown Library with early Filemaker consulting and library catalog record conversion.

Detailed information

STG worked with the John Carter Brown Library to redesign (and in some cases design from scratch) several databases for use in a variety of projects. Our first project involved several administrative databases, which are used to track donations to the library and administrative contacts. We converted the databases into a relational format which expressed the data structures more appropriately, designed new layouts to accommodate a wider range of workflow, and created scripts to assist with data update and regularization. Our second project involved the development of a database to hold and manage catalogue information which was being used to prepare a printed catalogue. The project involved filtering information from downloaded RLIN records, importing this information into a database for editing, and then exporting the information into a page layout program for formatting and printing. The database is also designed to support future electronic publication of these records if desired.

Project Details

  • Status: Completed
  • People involved: Julia Flanders (STG)
  • Departments involved: John Carter Brown Library
  • Type of project: Tools development

James Koetting Ghana Field Recordings Collection

One of the largest collections of field recordings from Ghana, this digital collection includes recorded interviews, musical demonstrations, field notebooks, photographs, commentary, and other original source material surrounding Koetting's research.

Project Website | Detailed information

Project Details

John Nicholas Brown Center Humanities Resource Database

The Humanities Resource Database was developed by the John Nicholas Brown Center and the Scholarly Technology Group at Brown University to survey existing research resources throughout New England as part of the National Endowment for the Humanities Regional Humanities Centers Planning Grant Initiatives.

Detailed information

STG designed a database-driven interface for cataloguing humanities institutions and their associated collections, programs, and experts. Bill McIver, Visiting Assistant Professor (CS), implemented PHP class definitions and other code for wrapping MySQL databases conveniently for use in HTML forms applications. Carole Mah implemented a complex web-based browsing, authoring, and editing environment for the project's 32-table relational database, extending McIver's PHP class tools and using them as a basis for modular code. Clair Iltis performed design work for the website.

Project Details

  • Status: Archived
  • People involved: Bill McIver (Computer Science, STG), Elli Mylonas (STG), Carole Mah (STG)
  • Departments involved: John Nicholas Brown Center
  • Type of project: Tools development, Design and methodology
  • Research Domains: Information architecture and modeling

Katrina Project Digital Archive

COMING SOON. Binders of hurricane Katrina related clippings, broadsides and other ephemera.

Detailed information

Project Details

  • Status: Ongoing
  • People involved: John Logan (Faculty lead)
  • Departments involved: Sociology
  • Type of project: Digital scholarly resources

Khrushchev

COMING SOON. Color slides and video depicting Nikita Khruschev & family (circa late-1960s to early-1970s).

Detailed information

Project Details

  • Status: Ongoing
  • People involved: Sergi Khrushchev
  • Departments involved: Watson Institute
  • Type of project: Digital scholarly resources

Latin American Travelogues

This project provides a selection of digitized Latin American travelogues, largely from the 19th century. Currently focused on Brazil, the works are linked to critical essays produced by undergraduate students enrolled in courses on Latin American history.

Project Website | Detailed information

STG designed a database-driven interface for cataloguing humanities institutions and their associated collections, programs, and experts. Bill McIver, Visiting Assistant Professor (CS), implemented PHP class definitions and other code for wrapping MySQL databases conveniently for use in HTML forms applications. Carole Mah implemented a complex web-based browsing, authoring, and editing environment for the project's 32-table relational database, extending McIver's PHP class tools and using them as a basis for modular code. Clair Iltis performed design work for the website.

Project Details

Lincoln Broadsides

A collection of broadsides, posters, pamphlets, maps, and miscellany highlighting Lincoln's place in the American consciousness.

Project Website | Detailed information

STG designed a database-driven interface for cataloguing humanities institutions and their associated collections, programs, and experts. Bill McIver, Visiting Assistant Professor (CS), implemented PHP class definitions and other code for wrapping MySQL databases conveniently for use in HTML forms applications. Carole Mah implemented a complex web-based browsing, authoring, and editing environment for the project's 32-table relational database, extending McIver's PHP class tools and using them as a basis for modular code. Clair Iltis performed design work for the website.

Project Details

Lincoln Graphics

Graphical material pertaining to Lincoln.

Project Website | Detailed information

STG designed a database-driven interface for cataloguing humanities institutions and their associated collections, programs, and experts. Bill McIver, Visiting Assistant Professor (CS), implemented PHP class definitions and other code for wrapping MySQL databases conveniently for use in HTML forms applications. Carole Mah implemented a complex web-based browsing, authoring, and editing environment for the project's 32-table relational database, extending McIver's PHP class tools and using them as a basis for modular code. Clair Iltis performed design work for the website.

Project Details

Lincoln Manuscripts

Graphical material pertaining to Lincoln.

Project Website | Detailed information

Project Details

Lincoln Objects

Objects from the Lincoln Collection.

Project Website | Detailed information

Project Details

Lincoln Sheet Music

Sheet music pertaining to Lincoln.

Project Website | Detailed information

Project Details

Lincolniana at Brown

A collection of manuscripts, images, broadsides, newspapers, sheet music and other objects by and about Abraham Lincoln.

Project Website | Detailed information

Project Details

Medieval Manuscripts

Medieval Manuscripts

Project Website | Detailed information

Project Details

  • Status: Completed
  • Departments involved: Language Resource Center

Mendel Website

MendelWeb is an educational resource for teachers and students interested in the origins of classical genetics, introductory data analysis, elementary plant science, and the history and literature of science.

Project Website | Detailed information

It is constructed around Gregor Mendel's 1865 paper Versuche über Pflanzen-Hybriden and a revised version of the English translation by C.T. Druery and William Bateson, Experiments in Plant Hybridization. This website is offered as a public sourcebook and collaborative environment compatible with a variety of guided and independent studies. The latest version of MendelWeb dates from February 1997. It was conceived and constructed by Roger Blumberg, former Senior Hypermedia Researcher at STG.

Project Details

  • Status: Completed
  • People involved: Roger Blumberg (Primary Investigator)
  • Type of Project: Digital scholarly resources
  • Project URL:http://www.mendelweb.org/

Michael Psellos on the Web

A website focusing on the letters of Michael Psellos, 11th c. Byzantine author, with accompanying contextual material.

Detailed information

Stratis Papaioannou is editing and researching Michael Psellos, and hopes to create a website that will provide a detailed listing of the letters, together with bibliographic and social metadata, as an introduction to Psellos' life and works, but also as tool to help himself and potentially other colleagues develop and share information about Psellos. He would like the website to represent part of his work in progress, as he clarifies the chronology of the letters and identifies the people who appear in them. He will also use the website as an up to date publication medium for bibliography on Psellos.

This project was begun, and significant progress was made in formulating XML structures for the letters and their metadata. The project is not yet complete.

Project Details

  • Status: Development
  • People involved: Eustratios Papaioannou (Faculty lead), Elli Mylonas (STG), Paul Caton (STG)
  • Departments involved: Classics
  • Type of Project: Digital scholarly resources
  • Research Domains: Metadata standards and practices, Information architecture and modeling

Minassian Collection of Persian, Mughal, and Indian Miniature Paintings

Miniature paintings from the estate of Mrs. Adrienne Minassian. The paintings often include text from Persian and Indian tales. Many of the illustrations within the Minassian Collection are depictions of stories from the classical Persian text, Shahnama of Ferdowsi.

Project Website | Detailed information

Project Details

Minassian Collection of Qur'anic Manuscripts

Collection of approximately 200 folders of Qur'anic leaves dating from the 8th century onward.

Project Website | Detailed information

Project Details

  • Status: Completed
  • People Involved: Nancy Khalek (Faculty lead), Chad Kia (Faculty lead)
  • Departments Involved: Religious Studies, Comparative Literature
  • Type of project: Signature collections
  • Research Domains: Digital collection development
  • Project URL:http://library.brown.edu/quran/

Modernist Journals Project

A digital research collection focusing on Modernist journals and magazines, together with essays, introductions, and biographical sketches.

Project Website | Detailed information

The Modernist Journals Project publishes fully searchable online editions of the English-language journals and magazines that were important in shaping the modes of literature and art that came to be called "modernist". Focusing on materials from 1890-1922, this collection is a crucial research tool and point of access to these often rare materials. First begun in 1995 at Brown University, the project is now supported at Brown and the University of Tulsa. The growing collection of materials now includes The New Age, Blast, Poetry, and The English Review, together with supporting materials such as essays on contributors, historical introductions, and biographical sketches.

STG worked with the MJP staff to develop encoding and metadata specifications for the digitized source materials, and in 2006 contributed to the design and implementation of a new user interface . CDS provides ongoing support for the project's data and publication infrastructure.

The CDI worked with the MJP staff to digitize all the periodicals and to develop metadata specifications. All MJP journals are stored in Brown's digital repository, and accessed from there by the MJP website.

In 2009, the MJP infrastructure was rewritten by the CDI to take advantage of the SOLR indexing engine, in order to increase efficiency. CDS provides ongoing consulting to the MJP as needed.

Project Details

  • Status: Ongoing
  • People Involved: Clifford Wulfman (STG), Mark Gaipa (Project Manager), Andrew Ashton (CDS), Patrick Yott (CDS), Michael Park (CDS), Robert Scholes (Faculty lead), Ann Caldwell (CDS), Elli Mylonas (STG), Kerri Hicks (STG)
  • Departments Involved: Modern Culture and Media
  • Type of project: Digital scholarly resources, Signature collections
  • Research Domains: Information architecture and modeling, Repository development and data curation
  • Funding: NEH
  • Project URL:http://dl.lib.brown.edu/mjp/

MonArch: Monastic Archaeology

An online publication of the excavation of the medieval monastery of St. Jean-des-Vignes in Soissons, France.

Project Website | Detailed information

Sheila Bonde and Clark Maines have been excavating the medieval monastery of St. Jean-des-Vignes in Soissons, France since 1982. They have been investigating forms of digital publication that will make it easy to link spatial data such as site plans, elevations and photographs of the site to the customary, a handbook that prescribes the structure of daily and religious life for this particular monastery.

STG's involvement with MonArch goes back to 1998, when a student built a simple animation of the monastery site plan, showing how it changing over time. Since that time, we have continued to work with Bonde and Maines developing a more detailed digital monograph about the excavation and their conclusions.

In 2001-2002, Bonde received an STG faculty grant to develop a pilot version of this project. STG put together a website that foregrounded the spatial aspects of the archaeological site, and linked to other information through them. We designed three connected systems to represent text, site plans and artifacts. The English and Latin text of the customary, the monastery's handbook, was encoded in XML using the TEI guidelines. A detailed set of subject keywords were encoded at the division, paragraph, and phrase level, allowing for retrieval of particular terms and topics. The system also included a database which contained records of individual artifacts found at the site. At the center was a site plan to which the locations of artifact and subjects cited in the customary were linked, allowing the reader to explore the architecture, its use, and material record.

In 2004, Bonde and Maines received an NEH grant to make full translations of the texts, generate new drawings, and develop a full version of the website. This project was carried forward with the help of Anne Loyer (Wesleyan) and Cliff Wulfman (STG). The system was completely redesigned using more robust XML software, and a new data infrastructure based on METS and MODS metadata. This resulted in a new site with signifiantly more information and more interactivity.

In 2008, Bonde received a Brown Seed grant to continue development.

Project Details

  • Status: Ongoing
  • People Involved: Clifford Wulfman (STG), Elli Mylonas (CDS), Julia Flanders (CDS), Kerri Hicks (STG), Morris Hirsch (STG), Clark Maines (Primary Investigator), Sheila Bonde (Primary Investigator)
  • Departments Involved: History of Art and Architecture
  • Type of project: Digital scholarly resources, Electronic publication
  • Research Domains: Information architecture and modeling, Markup theories and technologies
  • Funding: NEH, Brown Seed Grant, STG Faculty Grant
  • Project URL:http://monarch.brown.edu/

Motif Magazine

COMING SOON. Digital reproduction of Motif Magazine beginning in 2005. est. 60 issues

Detailed information

Project Details

  • Status: Ongoing
  • People Involved: Jim Vickers (External Consultant)
  • Type of project: Digital scholarly resources

Multimedia Lab

STG was instrumental in the development and support of Brown's Multimedia Lab, founded in 1994.

Project Website | Detailed information

The Brown University Multimedia Lab is a high-tech production facility used primarily by students in courses in the creative arts: electronic music, visual art, video and film production, multimedia authoring, and creative writing. The MML was founded in 1994 by a consortium of faculty in several departments. In 1995 it became a subsidiary project of the Scholarly Technology Group. Since 2004 it has been part of the Brown University Academic Services Group, in Computing and Information Services.

The Multimedia Lab consists of two separate facilities. The laboratory space is equipped with computers configured for midi music composition, non-linear editing, electronic imaging, and multimedia authoring. There is also a supported classroom with appropriate equipment for presenting anything produced in the lab. The MML is staffed by a team of student consultants who keep the space open 16 hours a day, and professional staff.

During July 1998 the Multimedia Lab website was completely updated and redesigned by Leslie Kleinberg, '98, and Giovanna Roz, under the supervision of David Reville.

Project Details

  • Status: Completed
  • People Involved: Edrex Fontanilla (STG), Barry Albright (STG), David Reville (STG)
  • Departments Involved: STG (Computing and Information Services), Computing and Information Services
  • Type of project: Research and consultation
  • Research Domains: New media theory
  • Project URL:http://www.brown.edu/cis/services/academic/mml

Murder in Marseille

The 1934 assassination of King Alexander of Yugoslavia, in Marseille, is the first political assassination to be captured on film.

Detailed information

Keith Brown has been studying the 1934 murder of King Alexander of Yugoslavia, in Marseille. He is interested in the political ramifications of the event, as well as the effects of the film, which was shown as a newsreel in different European countries. In the summer of 2004, he worked with five UTRA students, researching contemporary coverage of the assassination and subsequent murder trial from French, German and Italian newspapers and diplomatic correspondance. STG collaborated with Keith Brown to produce a digital monograph, and explore rhetorical structures that will serve to appropriately convey his research results. This project did not produce a website.

Project Details

  • Status: Archived
  • People Involved: Elli Mylonas (STG), Keith Brown (Faculty lead)
  • Departments Involved: Watson Institute
  • Type of project: Design and methodology
  • Research Domains: Electronic publishing, Interface design

Napoleonic Satires

A collection of Napoleonic satirical prints produced between 1792 and 1829, from Germany, Britain, France, Holland, and Russia, by such noted artists as James Gillray and George Cruikshank.

Project Website | Detailed information

Project Details

Neith Boyce Project

Neith Boyce resources and website

Detailed information

Carol DeBoer-Langworthy's research has focused on the American author Neith Boyce. She wrote her dissertation on Boyce, published an edition of her writing and is currently working on a biography. Her research is uncovering new materials about Boyce, and she would like to create a "Union Catalog" of Boyce materials. Her goal is to collect references to print and digital Boyce materials in one place, and to start sorting and classifying them.

DeBoer-Langworthy also wants a simple website in which to embed non-bibliographic materials about Boyce.

Project Details

  • Status: Development
  • People Involved: Carol DeBoer-Langworthy (Faculty lead), Elli Mylonas (CDS)
  • Departments Involved: English
  • Type of project: Digital scholarly resources
  • Research Domains: Interface design

Online Beginning Sanskrit Exercises

STG has implemented the linguistic tools developed by Peter Scharf and Malcolm Hyman through a web interface, in the form of exercises for beginning students.

Detailed information

Prof. Scharf has been developing digital materials for teaching Sanskrit, in the context of the Sanskrit Library. Initially, he developed second year reading texts that provide progressively more information to aid in identifying words, parsing the grammar and finally, translating. He is now working on introductory materials that teach students how to write in Deva Nagari, and how to manage sandhi transformations. He is working on this project with Malcolm Hyman, who is providing additional expertise in computational linguistics.

Project Details

  • Status: Completed
  • People Involved: Carole Mah (STG), Peter Scharf (Faculty lead)
  • Departments Involved: Classics
  • Type of project: Tools development
  • Research Domains: Information architecture and modeling
  • Related Links:Sanksrit Digital Library

Online Gazetteer of Sixteenth Century Florence

A searchable gazetteer of 16th c. Florence to accompany an electronic publication about renaissance Florence.

Project URL | Detailed information

R. Burr Litchfield has been researching the transition of Florentine civil society of the Republic to the court society of the Medici Grand Duchy as seen through the prism of the changing urban social geography, and has publishing a digital book on the subject, Florence Ducal Capital, 1530-1630. The book will contains links to a website showing the geographical details under discussion. The website, which is based on the 1594 edition of the Buonsignori map of Florence, also functions as a standalone resource to the geography and features of 16th c. Florence.

STG designed and implemented the searchable gazetteer, basiing it on digital photographs of the Buonsignori map of Florence, and implemented map viewing software to facilitate navigation. We developed a database to manage salient information on features of the city, which also served as the infrastructure for the information displayed on the website. This work was done before mapping and georeferencing was available on common platforms, such as Google Maps.

Project Details

Open eBook Publication Structure

Participation in the development of the Open eBook Publication Structure, an XML specification for hand-held electronic books.

Project URL | Detailed information

STG played a leading role in the development of the Open eBook Publication Structure 1.0. STG's specific objective in this project was to ensure that the OEB PS 1.0 standard was based on sound scientific and engineering research and reflected best practice in document architecture standards -- in order to create a high-performance interoperable data specification that would provide broad-based benefits to commerce and culture. We were particularly concerned to align OEB with current work in the W3C (particularly XML-related standards), promote the rigorous separation of structure and rendering semantics, and design mechanisms for disciplined extensions (to reconcile supporting innovation with maintaining interoperability). In addition we wanted to establish a foundation for supporting internationalization.

Although in the end a few compromises had to be made in version 1.0 in order to accommodate the constraints of existing practices and market dynamics, our goals were largely achieved and OEB PS 1.0 is a powerful interoperable architecture that is fast becoming the common data format for electronic books. For its role in this project STG received a formal commendation from the US Department of Commerce, National Institute for Standards and Technology.STG's Introduction to OEB PS 1.0 Overview (below) is based on presentations by Steve DeRose and Allen Renear at various conferences and workshops.

Project Details

Open eBook Validator

In collaboration with NuvoMedia, Inc., STG has provided a validation service for electronic books. This service enables authors and publishers to test their publications for conformance with Open eBook Publication Structure 1.0.

Detailed information

STG played a leading role in the development of the Open eBook Publication Structure 1.0. STG's specific objective in this project was to ensure that the OEB PS 1.0 standard was based on sound scientific and engineering research and reflected best practice in document architecture standards -- in order to create a high-performance interoperable data specification that would provide broad-based benefits to commerce and culture. We were particularly concerned to align OEB with current work in the W3C (particularly XML-related standards), promote the rigorous separation of structure and rendering semantics, and design mechanisms for disciplined extensions (to reconcile supporting innovation with maintaining interoperability). In addition we wanted to establish a foundation for supporting internationalization.

Although in the end a few compromises had to be made in version 1.0 in order to accommodate the constraints of existing practices and market dynamics, our goals were largely achieved and OEB PS 1.0 is a powerful interoperable architecture that is fast becoming the common data format for electronic books. For its role in this project STG received a formal commendation from the US Department of Commerce, National Institute for Standards and Technology.STG's Introduction to OEB PS 1.0 Overview (below) is based on presentations by Steve DeRose and Allen Renear at various conferences and workshops.

Project Details

  • Status: Archived
  • People Involved: Allen Renear (STG), Richard Goerwitz (STG)
  • Departments Involved: STG (Computing and Information Services)
  • Type of project: Tools development
  • Research Domains: Markup theories and technologies
  • Funding: NuovoMedia, Inc.
  • Related Links:International Digital Publishing Forum (formerly Open eBook Forum)

Oxford English Dictionary at Brown University

STG rewrote and upgraded a series of Common Gateway Interface scripts (developed originally by John Price-Wilkin at the University of Michigan) to make the text of the Oxford English Dictionary and its search engine (PAT) accessible to the Brown community through the Web.

Detailed information

The OED implementation developed here at STG was, at the time, groundbreaking in the sense that it offered ways of saving state (i.e., building on previously constructed searches) that few contemporary Web systems offered. Close collaboration with the Brown University Library Reference and Systems staff ensured that the system design would meet the needs of faculty and students. Brown University's library has subscribed to the OED online. This gives Brown users access to the newer edition of the OED, and since it is the version supported by the library, we are no longer supporting a local version.

Project Details

  • Status: Archived
  • People Involved: Richard Goerwitz (STG), Geoffrey Bilder (STG)
  • Departments Involved: STG (Computing and Information Services)
  • Type of project: Digital scholarly resources
  • Research Domains: Electronic publishing

Paris, Capital of the 19th Century

This project, initiated by the French Studies and Comparative Literature Departments, facilitates research across disciplines by digitizing library resources in various formats and media, and centralizes access to materials related to 19th century Paris.

Project URL | Detailed information

The OED implementation developed here at STG was, at the time, groundbreaking in the sense that it offered ways of saving state (i.e., building on previously constructed searches) that few contemporary Web systems offered. Close collaboration with the Brown University Library Reference and Systems staff ensured that the system design would meet the needs of faculty and students. Brown University's library has subscribed to the OED online. This gives Brown users access to the newer edition of the OED, and since it is the version supported by the library, we are no longer supporting a local version.

Project Details

Pembroke Record Digital Archive

A digital version of the Pembroke Record (1923-1970).

Project URL | Detailed information

From 1922 to 1970, the Pembroke Record documented and commented upon life at Pembroke College in Brown University. Although the Pembroke Record ceased publishing decades ago, it has remained a valuable archival resource and an irreplaceable part of the history of women at Brown University. The Pembroke Center Associates — a group of alumnae/i and friends that supports Brown's Pembroke Center for Teaching and Research on Women — partnered with the Brown University Library's Center for Digital Scholarship to digitize the Pembroke Record. The physical newspapers were removed from their bindings, photographically imaged, and saved as digital files. Those files have been extensively coded and can now be searched online.

Project Details

  • Status: Completed
  • People Involved: Ben Tyler (CDS), Christy Law Blanchard (Primary Investigator), Patrick Yott (CDS)
  • Departments Involved: Pembroke Center
  • Type of Project: Electronic publication, Digital scholarly resources
  • Research Domains: Electronic publishing, Interface design
  • Funding: Pembroke Center Associates
  • Project URL:http://dl.lib.brown.edu/pebr/

Perry In Japan

Materials for use in cross-cultural evaluation of Perry's encounter with the Japanese.

Project URL | Detailed information

Project Details

Petra Project

STG was actively involved in data organization at the start of Brown University's excavation of the Great Temple in Petra, Jordan, in 1994 and 1995.

Detailed information

Relational databases were extensively used to record ceramic data, small finds, and architectural fragments. We experimented with using handheld computers as possible replacements for traditional field notebooks. STG also consulted on the use of technology for surveying, drafting, and modeling the excavation site.

The excavation of the Great Temple at Petra by Brown University has been ongoing from 1993 through 1999. The excavation is funded by Brown University as part of its programs in Anthropology and in Old World Archaeology and Art. It is also an international and interdisciplinary project, with the active involvement of the American Center of Oriental Research, located in Amman, and the Department of Antiquities of the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan.

Project Details

  • Status: Archived
  • People Involved: Geoffrey Bilder (STG), Martha Sharp Joukowsky (Faculty lead)
  • Departments Involved: Joukowsky Institute for Archaeology and the Ancient World
  • Type of Project: Design and methodology, Digital scholarly resources
  • Research Domains: Repository development and data curation
  • Project URL:Current Petra Excavation Site

Pico's 900 Theses

A digital edition of the 900 Theses of Pico de la Mirandola ("Conclusiones Nongentae publicae disputandae", Rome 1486), published in Latin and English, with an annotation feature available to scholars who are part of the Pico Project.

Project URL | Detailed information

The project, which is part of Massimo Riva's research on publishing, using and teaching with digital text from Medieval and Renaissance Italy, is also an experiment in collaborative scholarship for critical electronic editions of texts in general. The Conclusiones is the second text undertaken by the Progetto Pico (Pico Project), after the Oratio which was published as a collaborative edition on the web. That edition, using the technologies available at the time, was delivered as a series of HTML pages.

STG marked up the Latin text of the Conclusiones in XML, according to the TEI guidelines, and added a provision for a group of scholars to annotate it. Originally this system was developed to work on the Tomcat framework using JSP. However, we have since converted it to run with PHP and MySQL for the annotations, and XML and XSLT for the textual components.

Recently, as part of the continuing development of the Riva's Virtual Humanities Lab, all the Pico texts will be integrated into the new VHL scholarly editions interface.

Project Details

  • Status: Completed
  • People Involved: Paul Caton (STG), Carole Mah (STG), Giovanna Roz (STG), Massimo Riva (Primary Investigator)
  • Departments Involved: Italian Studies
  • Type of Project: Tools development, Digital scholarly resources
  • Research Domains: Markup theories and technologies, Information architecture and modeling
  • Project URL:http://www.stg.brown.edu/projects/pico/

Port Huron Project

A conceptual art project about protest speech re-enactments and their reception.

Project URL | Detailed information

Mark Tribes' project is built around protest speeches from the New Left movements of the Vietnam era, which were re-enacted using actors in their original venues. The speeches were recorded using various media (high-definition video, ad hoc video, and still images). The project website documents the project and displays the work. STG provided design and implementation for the documentary website, evaluated video sites in order to see which would be best for disseminating video and made a database for archiving all the media that came out of the project.

Project Details

Postcolonial and Postimperial Literature Web

A hypertext collection of primary and secondary source materials for courses in contemporary postcolonial and postimperial literature in English.

Project URL | Detailed information

The Postcolonial and Postimperial LIterature Web was originated in 1985 by George Landow as part of Brown University's Institute for Research in Information and Scholarship (IRIS) Intermedia project. Professor Landow designed the entire web and manages the selection, creation, and linking of texts and images. Contributions are submitted by scholars, students, and other interested readers. In 1995, the Postcolonial and Postimperial Literature Web was converted to HTML and made available on STG's Web server. In additon to hosting this project on the Web, STG provided consulting services when needed. The Post-Colonial Web was further developed and is now hosted at the National University of Singapore.

Project Details

  • Status: Completed
  • People Involved: George P. Landow (Faculty lead)
  • Departments Involved: English
  • Type of Project: Digital scholarly resources
  • Research Domains: New media theory
  • Project URL:http://www.postcolonialweb.org/

Quran Browser Web

A simple and powerful web interface that supported active browsing of the Quran in three English translations, in a way not possible with traditional printed books.

Detailed information

The Quran Browser was based on a full-text search engine developed before the World Wide Web came into use. When the Web became a viable option, Richard Goerwitz, who had developed the software, wrote a searching and browsing interface for the web. The Quran Browser made it possible to search three English translations by passage, word, word part, or phrase, enabling research and study that would be difficult, if not impossible, with print-based versions. It was also possible to use regular expressions and Boolean operators in queries. The Quran Browser was designed specifically for educational use and was produced and maintained by Richard Goerwitz, who also developed the Bible Browser.

The available versions of the text were: M. M. Pickthall; Abdullah Yusufali; M. H. Shakir.

The Quran Browser was an early example of sophisticated text search and useful parallel text display. The code was retired when it was no longer possible to maintain it.

Project Details

  • Status: Archived
  • People Involved: Richard Goerwitz (STG)
  • Departments Involved: STG (Computing and Information Services)
  • Type of Project: Digital scholarly resources, Tools development

REST/LESS

An experiment in creating a digital, web based version of a poem by Thalia Field.

Detailed information

Thalia Field's aleatory poem, REST/LESS is navigated spatially by reading phrases placed along a grid on a page. The poem contains 80 such pages and was handwritten. She wanted to experiment with various different media formats for the poem. Currently, it has been performed as a multimedia dance piece, and is intended to be presented as a kiosk, an installation, as well as a website.

STG digitized the poem with the help of Patrick Yott of the library's Center for Digital Initiatives, transcribed all the phrases in the poem, and linked them to their page and location. We used a database to contain all this information, so that the spoken phrases could also be linked in. The materials we generated have been used in the multimedia dance piece that was performed by the Lostwax dance group. We are in the process of constructing a website, but the project is currently suspended.

Project Details

  • Status: Archived
  • People Involved: Thalia Field (Faculty lead), Kerri Hicks (STG), Elli Mylonas (STG)
  • Departments Involved: Literary Arts
  • Type of Project: Design and methodology
  • Research Domains: New media theory
  • Related Links: Restless performed by Lostwax Dance Company

Radical America

A digital edition of Radical America, a periodical published by Students for Democratic Society from 1966-1999. The original intent was to bring about the beginnings of a learning process inside SDS ranks about the radical traditions of this country and to provide a forum for students of American radicalism to exchange views on their field.

Project URL | Detailed information

The Postcolonial and Postimperial LIterature Web was originated in 1985 by George Landow as part of Brown University's Institute for Research in Information and Scholarship (IRIS) Intermedia project. Professor Landow designed the entire web and manages the selection, creation, and linking of texts and images. Contributions are submitted by scholars, students, and other interested readers. In 1995, the Postcolonial and Postimperial Literature Web was converted to HTML and made available on STG's Web server. In additon to hosting this project on the Web, STG provided consulting services when needed. The Post-Colonial Web was further developed and is now hosted at the National University of Singapore.

Project Details

Ramopakhyana: electronic publishing of a Sanskrit textbook

An electronic tool for delivering independent-study online editions of Sanskrit texts for self-guided language study using the Ramopakhyana, is one of the texts in "Kramapatha: A foreign language reader for the sequential unfoldment of knowledge.

Detailed information

This edition of the Ramopakhyana consists of the verses of the Sanskrit text accompanied by detailed study aids for each verse: roman transliteration, word-by-word sandhi analysis and grammatical analysis, Sanskrit prose paraphrase, notes on interpretation, and English prose translation. Each type of study-aid information is dynamically retrieved from the database and presented to the reader on demand; user-specified global parameters can be set to determine automatically how much and what kind of help the reader will be shown. The printed counterpart to the online edition presents all the above information for each verse in a more conventional static textbook format.

STG worked on the creation of a printed counterpart to the on-line text edition: that is, producing from the database files the camera-ready copy for the printed textbook, as specified by the publisher. The data provided by the parent project lead is stored in whitespace-delimited fields in seven text files (one for each data category, such as Sanskrit text, transliteration, or translation) created with the desired roman and Nagari PostScript fonts in Microsoft Word. A Perl script extracts the appropriate data verse by verse from each file, and writes out a TeX file combining the items in each data category corresponding to each verse, and including the necessary TeX macros to specify the desired layout for each type of data. TeX virtual fonts are invoked to incorporate the desired PostScript fonts into the output. The result is a ready-to-print document of several hundred pages for which many sophisticated typesetting tasks (line breaking, hyphenation, and spacing; page breaking; page headers; double-column format; tables; font changes) are handled automatically according to user-specified parameters, with no markup or editing required on the part of the user.

Project Details

  • Status: Archived
  • People Involved: Peter Scharf (Faculty lead), Kim Plofker (STG)
  • Departments Involved: Classics
  • Type of Project: Electronic publication
  • Research Domains: Electronic publishing
  • Funding: Consortium for Language Learning and Teaching
  • Related Links:Sanskrit Digital Library

Reading Digital Literature and Art

STG supported Roberto Simanowski's Wayland Collegium seminar by building and maintaining the seminar web site and blog.

Project URL | Detailed information

Roberto Simanowski received a Wayland Collegium grant for a faculty seminar on approaches to digital aesthetics. The seminar met eight times over the 2005-2006 academic year, and hosted two visiting digital art installations.

The website and blog served to manage the seminar as it was happening, and now archive summaries of the presentations and discussions.

Project Details

  • Status: Completed
  • People Involved: Clifford Wulfman (STG), Kerri Hicks (STG), Elli Mylonas (STG), Roberto Simanowski (Faculty lead)
  • Departments Involved: German Studies
  • Type of Project: Research and consultation, Events and outreach
  • Research Domains: New media theory
  • Project URL:http://dev.stg.brown.edu/projects/netart

Repository

This is the workflow-tracker project for Workbench uploads, dissertations, and likely other things.

Detailed information

Project Details

  • Status: Ongoing

Romanian Love Charms

A structural analysis of Romanian love charms.

Project URL | Detailed information

Sanda Golopentia had constructed a corpus of Romanian love charms on the Brown mainframe over 10 years ago. This was implemented by Allen Renear using Waterloo Script, and was used to typeset a book analyzing the love charms. Since then, she has been expanding the corpus by adding more texts, and wanted to perform the same classification and analysis as she had before. In order for this to be possible, the digital texts had to be converted into a database, and provided with an interface via the WWW. Together with Prof. Golopentia, STG also developed a simple website about the love charms, containing ancillary materials such audio and video of the charms.

STG analyzed the original Script files in order to determine the structures that were put in place, and create an SQL database, accessible via the web. This is now in place and Prof. Golopentia is correcting and adding to it. We have also implemented a website to to display the charms and their classifications.

Project Details

  • Status: Completed
  • People Involved: Sanda Golopentia (Faculty lead), Elli Mylonas (STG), Carole Mah (STG)
  • Departments Involved: French Studies
  • Type of Project: Design and methodology
  • Research Domains: Markup theories and technologies
  • Project URL:http://www.stg.brown.edu/projects/romanianCharms

SGML and HTML Document Validation Service

An early web based validation tool for SGML and HTML files. It was replaced by the XML validator.

Detailed information

This was an early service that validated the markup of HTML and SGML documents submitted via a web form. When a user provided the text of a document (or its URL) and selected from a menu of Document Type Definitions (DTDs), the document was parsed and validated against the selected DTD. An output report listed any errors found. This was a user friendly web interface to the command line tool nsgmls. The SGML Validator was rendered obsolete and withdrawn when XML replaced SGML as the commonly used markup language for web and scholarly projects. The HTML specification had also evolved, and validators for HTML files became available on the web and as part of common HTML editors.

Project Details

  • Status: Archived
  • People Involved: Richard Goerwitz (STG)
  • Departments Involved: STG (Computing and Information Services)
  • Type of Project: Tools development
  • Research Domains: Information architecture and modeling, Markup theories and technologies

Sanborn Maps for the State of Rhode Island

COMING SOON. Collection of Sanborn Maps of Rhode Island.

Detailed information

Project Details

  • Status: Ongoing
  • Type of Project: Digital scholarly resources
  • Research Domains: Repository development and data curation

School Data Collection on the Web

In order to explore the feasibility of using the Web to facilitate data collection across school districts, STG created a set of CGI scripts to provide statistical information to the New Hampshire State Department of Education.

Project URL | Detailed information

Student researcher Santiago Barona '98 developed an HTML form to replace the traditional paper form. Data from the form was automatically entered into a database and could be quickly accessed by administrators.

Project Details

  • Status: Archived
  • People Involved: Roger Blumberg (STG), Richard Goerwitz (STG)
  • Departments Involved: STG (Computing and Information Services)
  • Type of Project: Tools development
  • Research Domains: Information architecture and modeling
  • Funding: NetTech (Northeast Regional Technology in Education Consortium, The Education Alliance at Brown University
  • Project URL:http://dev.stg.brown.edu/projects/CDSFiles/1997SchoolDataCollection.pdf

Social and Intellectual Context of Luise K. Gottsched

A site about the influences, context and life of Luise Kulmus (Gottsched), an 18th German poet who played a significant role in bringing the ideas of the English Enlightenment to Germany. The site also contains texts and letters by Kulmus.

Project URL | Detailed information

Katherine Goodman studies the 18th c. poet Luise Kulmus (Gottsched), viewing her as an exemplary figure of the German Enlightenment. Kulmus, born in Danzig, married Johann Christoph Gottsched, an important figure in the German enlightenment who was influenced primarily by French culture and reflected its style and ideas. To help counter this image of the German Enlightenment Goodman presents Kulmus, who grew up in Danzig, a major seaport with strong trading and intellectual ties to England and Holland. Luise Kulmus had access and was open to ideas from England much earlier than many in the interior of Germany. The advent of German interest in English literature is routinely dated at around 1750, but Luise Kulmus brought her interest into her marriage with Gottsched in 1735. Throughout the remainder of her life (until 1762) she worked full-time at his side and introduced works of the English Enlightenment (Addison, Steele, Pope) to German audiences (by translating them and reviewing them in her husband's periodicals).

STG put together an experimental digital monograph to present Goodman's research on Kulmus. Text documents such as her letters and juvenilia were marked up using XML according to the TEI guidelines. We also devised a simple hypertextual structure to guide readers along Goodman's arguments, as well as allow them to explore the information on their own.

This project focuses on the young Kulmus through her and her husband's writing. It contains short essays and notes by Goodman herself as well as images from the period.

Project Details

  • Status: Completed
  • People Involved: Carole Mah (STG), Elli Mylonas (STG), Julia Flanders (STG), Kay Goodman (Faculty lead)
  • Departments Involved: German Studies
  • Type of Project: Digital scholarly resources
  • Research Domains: Electronic publishing
  • Project URL:http://www.stg.brown.edu/projects/Gottsched/

Steering Committee on Slavery and Justice

An archive of a wide array of historical documents, from the records of slaving voyages to student commencement orations, digitized in support of the work of the University Steering Committee on Slavery and Justice.

Project URL | Detailed information

Project Details

TEI to RTF Conversion Utility

As part of the preparations for the TEI10 conference in 1997, STG had to convert abstracts submitted in TEI markup into RTF, so that they could be printed in the abstracts booklet. For this purpose, we used James Clark's Jade DSSSL engine, and modified Richard Light's style sheets for TEI. We also made it more accessible by using a web form to submit files to the converter.

Project URL | Detailed information

This utility was developed for STG internal purposes only, and is not optimized as a general purpose tool.

Project Details

TEI10 Conference

In October 1997, STG co-sponsored TEI10, a conference celebrating the tenth anniversary of the Text Encoding Initiative, an international project to develop guidelines for the encoding of textual material in electronic form for research purposes.

Project URL | Detailed information

In addition to organizing and hosting the conference, STG developed or adapted a variety of electronic tools to help our presenters and local organizers produce extended abstracts in SGML or HTML (for presentation on the conference's website) and then to convert them into a format suitable for print production to distribute to conference attendees.

One such tool was a TEI to RTF Conversion Utility, used to convert abstracts submitted in TEI markup into RTF, so that they could be printed in the abstracts booklet. For this purpose, we used James Clark's Jade DSSSL engine, and modified Richard Light's style sheets for TEI. We also made it more accessible by using a web form to submit files to the converter.This utility was developed for STG internal purposes only, and was never optimized as a general purpose tool.

Project Details

  • Status: Completed
  • People Involved: Allen Renear (STG), Richard Goerwitz (STG), Elli Mylonas (STG)
  • Departments Involved: STG (Computing and Information Services)
  • Type of Project: Events and outreach
  • Research Domains: Markup theories and technologies
  • Funding: The Text Encoding Initiative, Martin Hensel Corporation and Kluwer Academic Publishers
  • Project URL:http://www.stg.brown.edu/conferences/tei10
  • Related Links:Text Encoding Initiative Consortium

Table of Contents Generator

A utility to take Web documents and construct a table of contents out of <H-gt; entities (headings).

Detailed information

When a document URL was submitted to this utility, a hierarchical table of contents was created from the HTML headings. Each table of contents entry was linked to the appropriate section of the original document. The table of contents made it easy to visualize large documents in an outline form. It was conceived by STG's director, Allen Renear, and implemented under the direction of STG's programming staff by Shawn Zeller, '00.

Project Details

  • Status: Archived
  • People Involved: Richard Goerwitz (STG)
  • Departments Involved: STG (Computing and Information Services)
  • Type of Project: Tools development
  • Research Domains: Electronic publishing

Technology Platforms for 21st Century Literature Conference

A conference on the authoring, publishing, and reading tools of the future.

Project URL | Detailed information

In April, 1999, STG and the Program in Creative Hyperfiction Workshops hosted the Technology Platforms for 21st Century Literature conference--a three-day meeting and workshop for writers, publishers, and technologists to shape the authoring, publishing, and reading tools of the future. A world-class group of electronic and traditional writers and theorists, and technologists whose software is designed for writing in electronic form came together to discuss the requirements and work styles of the writers and the software and development plans of the technologists. During this conference, talks and panel discussions were interspersed with and readings and product demonstrations. Ideas and connections emerging from this conference led to the development of the Electronic Literature Organization.

Project Details

  • Status: Archived
  • People Involved: David Reville (STG), Robert Coover (Faculty lead), Elli Mylonas (STG)
  • Departments Involved: Literary Arts
  • Type of Project: Events and outreach
  • Research Domains: New media theory
  • Funding: Scholarly Technology Group, Computing and Information Services, US Web, SoftBank, Inc., Ziff-Davis, Inc., Internet Capital Group
  • Project URL:http://www.stg.brown.edu/conferences/TP21CL/index.html
  • Related Links:Electronic Literature Organization

Technology: Material Culture in the Built Environment

Images collected by Pat Malone over the years.

Project URL | Detailed information

Project Details

  • Status: Ongoing
  • People Involved: Pat Malone
  • Departments Involved: American Civilization
  • Project URL:http://dl.lib.brown.edu/

Texts of the Italian Renaissance

The Center for Digital Scholarship is developing a framework for exploring and annotating TEI P5-encoded texts. This project is founded on the work of previous projects, such as the Virtual Humanities Lab, Pico Project, and the Decameron Web, and is developed in collaboration with Massimo Riva of the Department of Italian Studies.

Project URL | Detailed information

The Center for Digital Scholarship is developing a framework for exploring and annotating TEI P5-encoded texts. This project is founded on the work of previous projects, such as the Virtual Humanities Lab, Pico Project, and the Decameron Web, and is developed in collaboration with Massimo Riva of the Department of Italian Studies. Using Brown's substantial collection of XML-encoded Italian Renaissance texts as a pilot, CDS is building a common framework to allow scholars to work with a variety of texts in a shared space; scholars can: browse XML-rendered texts, or, page through transcriptions by browsing the scanned pages from physical editions, compare translations side-by-side, and annotate texts. Annotations are created and disseminated using the AtomPub protocol - an XML-based standard for editing and publishing content across web resources.

Project Details

  • Status: Development
  • People Involved: Elli Mylonas (CDS), Andrew Ashton (CDS), Massimo Riva (Faculty lead)
  • Departments Involved: Italian Studies
  • Type of Project: Digital scholarly resources, Tools development, Design and methodology
  • Research Domains: Information architecture and modeling, Interface design, Markup theories and technologies
  • Project URL:http://www.stg.brown.edu/projects/vlab

The Global Security Matrix

The Global Security Matrix is a classification and visualization of different types of threat in different contexts, ranging from the personal to the global.

Project URL | Detailed information

James Derderian leads the Global Security Program at Brown's Watson Insitute. He wanted to continue development of the Matrix itself, add information to flesh out the categories and integrate information derived from the 2006-2007 lecture series on the same subject. STG provided support to Derderian and his team in order to develop a website around a particular visualization of threats and contexts for global security. STG is primarily providing infrastructure support for the portions of the website that use databases. STG is working with John Caserta, who is designing the website, and leading the website implementation project.

Project Details

  • Status: Completed
  • People Involved: James Derderian (Faculty lead), Kerri Hicks (STG)
  • Departments Involved: Watson Institute
  • Type of Project: Design and methodology
  • Research Domains: Interface design
  • Project URL:http://www.globalsecuritymatrix.org/

The Lincoln Log: A Daily Chronology of the Life of Abraham Lincoln

STG consulted on the XML markup of the digital Lincoln Day by Day documents, and implemented a website that allows a user to access the text through a calendar interface as well as by place or person names.

Project URL | Detailed information

The Papers of Abraham Lincoln have been supplementing and correcting Lincoln Day by Day, a publication that catalogs where Lincoln was, and what he did on each day of his documented life, excluding the Presidency. This is part of their efforts to identify, image, and publish, both comprehensively in electronic form and selectively in printed volumes, all documents written by or to Abraham Lincoln during his entire lifetime (1809-1865).

Project Details

  • Status: Completed
  • People Involved: Morris Hirsch (STG), Elli Mylonas (STG), Julia Flanders (STG)
  • Type of Project: Digital scholarly resources
  • Research Domains: Electronic publishing
  • Project URL:http://www.thelincolnlog.org/

Theater that was Rome

A digital collection of views and maps from Rome of the 16th-18th c. and a website with further information about individual prints in a selection of the books.

Project URL | Detailed information

This digital collection features a selection of works from the extraordinary collection of Vincent J. Buonanno '66, focused on views and maps of the Eternal City from the 16th-18th centuries. Festival prints and architectural treatises from the collection of the John Hay Library are also included.

In addition, Evie Lincoln has been studying and teaching about engraving and early modern Rome with this digital collection of illustrated books. Her primary interest is in the books themselves: how the authors, engravers and publishers presented the information about Rome to their audience.The digital presentation of these rare and expensive books allows readers to study not only the images, but also the text and context of the books.

STG has built a website around the library resource that contains enhanced metadata about individual pages and illustrations in the books. Together with the CDI, they developed detailed MODS records and assembled them into book objects. They also experimented with different ways of navigating through books and page images in the digital repository.

Project Details

  • Status: Ongoing
  • People Involved: Clifford Wulfman (STG), Elli Mylonas (CDS), Andrew Ashton (CDS), Evie Lincoln (Faculty lead)
  • Departments Involved: History of Art and Architecture
  • Type of Project: Signature collections, Digital scholarly resources
  • Research Domains: Metadata standards and practices, Repository development and data curation
  • Project URL:http://www.stg.brown.edu:8080/exist/rome
  • Related Links:Theater that was Rome Project website

Typographic Regularization in the WWP Textbase

A report on research in pattern matching rules for correcting archaic spelling in modern English.

Project URL | Detailed information

In materials printed before 1630, the letters v, u, j, and i did not have the values that they have today. The word that we spell ivory was written iuory, the word that we spell jury was written iury, etc. This difference in typographical conventions makes early texts more difficult to read and compromises the matching of forms in information retrieval tasks.

The Women Writers Project uses SGML tagging to encode a regularized spelling for such typographical variants, thereby allowing the option to display and search on either the original form or the regularized form. Encoding this information by hand was time-consuming and inefficient, since a great many high-frequency words require such tagging (e.g, haue, loue, iudge).

STG undertook to develop a system to automatically tag words subject to this typographic convention with the regularized form. To a great extent, pattern matching rules based on the linguistic principles for English consonants and vowels can be invoked to identify and tag words appropriately. These rules are supplemented by programs that recognize SGML markup indicating such things as word division across a line break, errors or abbreviations within a word, or structural elements to be excluded from regularization.

The Brown University Women Writers Project's main undertaking is an SGML-encoded full-text database of pre-Victorian women's writing in English. This collection currently includes nearly 200 texts representing a broad cross-section of the literate culture of pre-Victorian Britain. The WWP supports teaching and research in a wide variety of disciplines such as English, history, women's studies, comparative literature, and religious studies.

Project Details

US Epigraphy Project

The goal of the US Epigraphy project is to create an XML publication of all Greek, Roman and Etruscan epigraphic texts in American collections.

Project URL | Detailed information

Initially, the project focused on collecting metadata and images. It is now also entering the text for each inscription and will eventually add translation and notess. John Bodel has been the director of the US Epigraphy Project since 1995. US Epigraphy is a member of the group developing the Epidoc DTD, a TEI conformant DTD for encoding classical inscriptions. In the future, the project will also develop some basic pedagogical tools to exploit the instructional potential of the photographic archive (e.g., to illustrate styles of writing, ligatures, stonecutters' marks, erased, corrected, or supplemented text, etc.).

STG provided technical advice and assistance in developing an XML/TEI template in accordance with Epidoc guidelines, to convert the 2,300 published inscriptions mounted at the project website into XML, and implement a system that searches and displays them. We are also performing an update and redesign of the website.

STG and CDS are providing support to US Epigraphy on an ongoing bases, working with John Bodel, his project manager and student encoders. In 2009/2010 we completed the conversion of all US Epigraphy files into Epidoc P5 format. As part of our work on US Epigrapy, STG and CDS have provided input to the group developing the Epidoc P5 schema.

In 2010 CDS will convert the current US Epigraphy delivery system, which uses perl and an XSLT transform engine as well as premade HTML files for efficiency, to use SOLR. We will also redesign the website.

Project Details

  • Status: Ongoing
  • People Involved: Andrew Ashton (CDS), John Bodel (Faculty lead), Elli Mylonas (CDS), Carole Mah (STG)
  • Departments Involved: Classics
  • Type of Project: Digital scholarly resources, Tools development
  • Research Domains: Digital collection development, Information architecture and modeling
  • Project URL:http://usepigraphy.brown.edu/

Underground Rhode Island

A collection of oral histories and supporting materials about the arts in 20thc. Rhode Island. These materials formed part of an exhibit, and continued to grow as a digital collection.

Project URL | Detailed information

In the spring semester of 2004, the students in Paul Buhle's oral history class investigated the arts in 20th c. RI. The interviews and supporting materials they collected provided the raw materials for an exhibit at the Providence Historical Society, and later at the Newport Jazz Festival. The corpus of oral histories, now called Underground Rhode Island, will continue to grow each year as successive oral history classes interview members of the RI arts communities.

Using two years of oral histories as well as materials from the exhibits, STG created a digital version of Underground Rhode Island. Working with Paul Buhle’s students, we digitized the oral histories, transcripts and visual material that had been collected, catalogued it and made it accessible through a website. This project is also an exemplary collaboration between the library's Center for Digital Initiatives and STG, as all the primary source data is stored in the CDI's digital repository. Finally, we worked with the students to systematize and document the production of the interviews and transcriptions for future classes, to facilitate their inclusion in the database.

Project Details

Universal Design / Accessibility

STG undertook a study of best practices in universal design as it relates to technological support for teaching and learning. Together with the Sheridan Center and the Office of Disability Support Services, we created a comprehensive training program for Brown faculty designed to inform them of the best practices in accessible design, and to encourage adoption of those practices in curriculum design, instruction, and evaluation.

Detailed information

1. Created guidelines and a curriculum for training faculty and staff web developers; planned and executed training

It is our strong opinion that although specific disabilities must be addressed, the most broadly applicable training will be centered in the principles encompassed by the seven tenets of universal design.

Integrated research from CAST, Sheridan Center, and many other resources. Created training materials and conducted training in various formats, including face-to-face, printed, online, etc. (taking into account varied learning and teaching styles) Advocated for faculty participation.

2. Created a web-based tagged PDF for delivering the content of the curriculum

Web site to deliver training that is developed in section one above - This third site, discussed in some detail in § 1 above, is designed to disseminate the curriculum and training information to the faculty.

3. Assessed and integrated accessible computing facilities

CIS once housed a small, out-dated "accessible" computing cluster. For universal access, these facilities should be made more readily available to users, with updated software and hardware that is integrated into currently existing public facilities. We undertook a comprehensive study of the existing hardware and software, and to suggested changes to the current facilities.

4. Offered faculty grants for implementing universal design in instructional materials

While faculty generally agree that universal access is important, they often do not have the time or resources to apply to changing their existing materials, or learning how to adapt their styles in developing new materials. With the funds from these grants, we consulted with faculty and trained students those faculty designated, and paid those students for the UD work they do up to the limit of each grant ($500-$1000).

5. Installed a parsing proxy server

Universal access to digital information is one overarching goal of this project. While this will not happen overnight, we will put measures into place to mitigate the impact of existing inaccessible or difficult-to-access web sites. We made a parsing proxy server available, called Betsie (BBC Education Text to Speech Internet Enhancer http://www.bbc.co.uk/education/betsie/). Betsie creates text versions of web sites, helping to make them more accessible for those using non-standard text-based browsers.

Project Details

  • Status: Completed
  • People Involved: Kerri Hicks (STG), Robert Shaw (Faculty lead)
  • Departments Involved: Education
  • Type of Project: Research and consultation
  • Funding: US Department of Education

Victorian Web

A seminal hypertext resource on Victorian England, created by George Landow in 1985 and migrated over time into HTML.

Project URL | Detailed information

The Victorian Web is a hypertext resource of primary and secondary source materials for courses in Victorian literature. It was originated in 1985 by George P. Landow as part of Brown University's Institute for Research in Information and Scholarship (IRIS) Intermedia project. Professor Landow designed the entire web and manages the selection, creation, and linking of texts and images.

In 1995 the Victorian Web was converted to HTML and made available on STG's Web server. In addition to hosting this project on the Web, STG provided consulting services when needed.

Project Details

  • Status: Completed
  • People Involved: George P. Landow (Faculty lead)
  • Departments Involved: English
  • Type of Project: Digital scholarly resources
  • Research Domains: Digital collection development, New media theory
  • Project URL:http://www.victorianweb.org/

Views and Re-views: Soviet Political Posters and Cartoons

Czech and Russian Soviet-era posters and postcards.

Project URL | Detailed information

est. 161

Project Details

Virtual Humanities Lab

An online context for resources, tools and collaborative spaces for the study of Renaissance Italian literature.

Project URL | Detailed information

In 2004, Massimo Riva received an NEH grant to develop a Virtual Humanities Lab, a context for resources, tools and collaborative spaces for the study of Renaissance Italian literature. The project was managed by Vika Zafrin, and STG provided technical support and consulting where necessary.

The goal of the VHL is to combine diverse digital resources into an experimental model for collaborative scholarship and pedagogy. This will be presented in a highly interactive website with information about the civic experience and the literary and intellectual culture of Early Modern Italy (Florence in particular), and also a variety of tools for collaborative teaching and research – specifically, annotation and discussion of primary texts – organized as a multidisciplinary “virtual laboratory” for the humanities.

The 2004 NEH grant allowed a group of scholars and graduate students to annotate a set of digital texts: specifically, Giovanni Villani's Nuova Cronica and Boccaccio's Esposizioni sopra la Comedia di Dante. The texts and their annotations were published using a php/XML framework, with annotations handled as they had been for the Conclusiones in the Pico Project.

Since 2009, the CDS has been continuing work on the VHL project by developing new architectures and frameworks for handling annotations and for displaying related text assets.

Project Details

  • Status: Ongoing
  • People Involved: Massimo Riva (Faculty lead), Vika Zafrin (Project Manager), Paul Caton (STG)
  • Departments Involved: Italian Studies
  • Type of Project: Digital scholarly resources, Tools development
  • Project URL:http://golf.services.brown.edu/projects/VHL

Visual Inspection of Chinese Art

Consultation with a faculty member to use Photoshop to compare components of Chinese paintings

Detailed information

Maggie Bickford's research on Chinese art of the Song dynasty requires her to compare components of paintings that may vary greatly in size and orientation. She has to examine images in great detail and also to juxtapose components so as to compare and overlay them. Digital images are a perfect format for her research, as she can see far greater detail than even the original object can provide, in some cases, and she can also isolate features and resize or rotate them.

Together with Ed Huff of the Multimedia Lab, STG worked with Prof. Maggie Bickford to assist her in specing and setting up a workstation for viewing and analyzing high quality digital images of Chinese art. After she acquired the workstation, she learned how to use Adobe Photoshop to compare images and parts of images, and started to develop a methodology for manipulating images and recording what she had done for research purposes. Finally, an STG student developed a series of Photoshop scripts to perform standard manipulations.

Project Details

  • Status: Completed
  • People Involved: Maggie Bickford (Faculty lead), Ed Huff (STG), Elli Mylonas (STG)
  • Departments Involved: History of Art and Architecture
  • Type of Project: Tools development, Research and consultation

Voyage of the Slave Ship Sally (1764-1765)

A resource to publish and explicate the documentary evidence of the first slave trading voyage sponsored by the Brown brothers of Providence, RI.

Project URL | Detailed information

This project arose from the work of the Brown University Committee on Slavery and Justice, led by James Campbell. The committee investigated the contributions that slavery made to the early days of Brown University, and recommended ways to make the community at large think productively about slavery and and its aftermath. The Voyage of the Sally site was published as part of the committee's final report, which was released in October, 2006.

For this project STG developed a website to publish and explicate the documentary evidence of the first slave trading voyage invested in by the Brown brothers of Providence, RI. Students encoded the texts of letters, contracts and the ship's logbook in XML, using the TEI Guidelines. The site presents the original page images, together with searchable full-text transcriptions and contextual information from the markup such as regularized names, commodities and places. Accompanying these source materials are a set of introductory essays on the history and significance of the voyage. The project was planned and implemented in close collaboration with the Center for Digital Initiatives in the Brown University Library.

Project Details

WALDO: Metadata for Distributed K-12 Resources

The overall goal of the WALDO project was to develop tools and techniques for improving access to educational materials on the internet and to establish a common framework for indexing and searching across federally funded education sites.

Project URL | Detailed information

The overall goal of the WALDO project was to develop tools and techniques for improving access to educational materials on the internet and, more specifically, to establish a common framework for indexing and searching across federally funded education sites. The US Department of Education supports numerous public access websites that provide information to educators, administrators, policy makers, and students. The WALDO project was one of several responses to an early internet initiative calling for the provision of "one stop" access to materials on any of these sites. STG's contribution to the project was to evaluate metadata strategies for cataloging and retrieval of education materials and to provide a draft record structure and test suite of cataloged resources.

The WALDO project was a collaboration between the New England and South Central Regional Technology in Education Consortia, NetTech and SCR*TEC, respectively. The NetTech component was undertaken by Brown University, represented by the Education Alliance and the Scholarly Technology Group, and the Eisenhower National Clearinghouse for Math and Science. SCR*TEC, now known as HPR*TEC (High Plains Regional Technology in Education Consortium), created a beta site that implemented the project\'s research findings.

Project Details

What Did You Do in the War, Grandma? Website

A collection of oral histories of RI women's experiences during WWII, gathered by South Kingstown High School students.

Project URL | Detailed information

What Did You Do in the War, Grandma? is an oral history of Rhode Island women during World War II. In 1988-1989, students in the honors English program at South Kingstown High School interviewed 36 women who recalled their lives in the years before, during, and after the war. In addition to transcribing the interviews, students researched the period and wrote character sketches of the women they interviewed.

STG redesigned the successful website What Did You Do in the War, Grandma? to improve accessibility and to exploit advances in streaming audio technology. We modified the appearance of the site and made some changes to the navigational structure, making it easier to find the various sections of the site, and making individual pages more readable. STG revised and expanded the timeline, and made one of the interviews available in its entirety, using the newly installed Real Audio server. This included not only digitizing the original tape, but creating a sequence of pages that situate and support the interview in a regional, national, and international context. These pages are presented as HTML files synchronized with portions of the interview. STG also created an additional utility, STG cEvents, to link audio files to transcripts and indexes. This technology was later put to excellent use in the "1968: the Whole World was Watching" project.

In 2009, Marie Force sent us an index she had created to the Grandma interviews, as part of her Masters project in Library Science, and it was appended to the website.

Project Details

Women Writers Project

The Women Writers Project is a long-term research and publication project, focused on new methods of representing scholarly research materials in digital form. The WWP's published collection, Women Writers Online, is an internationally recognized resource for the study of early modern women's writing.

Project URL | Detailed information

Initiated in 1985, the Women Writers Project is devoted to research on early women's writing and electronic text encoding. The WWP's main undertaking is an XML-encoded full-text database of pre-Victorian women's writing in English, published in 1999 as Women Writers Online. This collection currently includes nearly 300 texts representing a broad cross-section of Anglophone women's literate culture before 1850. It supports teaching and research in a wide range of disciplines such as English, history, women's studies, comparative literature, and religious studies. The WWP also conducts extensive research on the methodologies and technologies which support this collection. Closely linked with the Text Encoding Initiative since its beginning, the WWP has worked on testing the TEI Guidelines for use with early printed books and has documented significant modifications to the TEI which accommodate the special features of these texts. The WWP has also prepared documentation and training materials which specify which TEI elements are used and exactly how and where they are to be applied. Equal attention has been paid to the details of editorial and transcription methodology, resulting in detailed guidelines for WWP internal training and for the benefit of WWP users. The WWP has also contributed to current international discussions of editorial theory and text encoding. There are long-standing collaborative ties between the WWP, STG, and the library, resulting in the development of metadata specifications, publication and interface tools, and shared outreach activities.

Project Details

World War I Sheet Music

A collection of over 1,700 pieces of sheet music published during World War I, including works written by Irving Berlin, George M. Cohan, and performed by Al Jolson and the Ziegfeld Follies.

Project URL | Detailed information

Project Details

Writers Online

An audio Internet archive of the Literary Arts Program at Brown University – an attempt, however modest, to make available to remote listeners, on campus and off, the pleasure of hearing, in real time, readings and performances by the many writers who have taken part in our Contemporary Writers Reading Series, Writers On Writing Reading Series, and numerous conferences and festivals sponsored by the Program during the last ten years.

Project URL | Detailed information

An audio Internet archive of the Literary Arts Program at Brown University – an attempt, however modest, to make available to remote listeners, on campus and off, the pleasure of hearing, in real time, readings and performances by the many writers who have taken part in our Contemporary Writers Reading Series, Writers On Writing Reading Series, and numerous conferences and festivals sponsored by the Program during the last ten years. Writers Online is an ongoing project created by the Literary Arts Program in conjunction with the Brown University Libraries. The page is a “work in progress” – new readings will be added, so check back often.

Project Details

Writing Vietnam Website

The Writing Vietnam conference was held at Brown University on April 21-23, 1999. After the conference, STG, designed and created a website to disseminate the narratives, discussions, and other materials generated by the conference.

Project URL | Detailed information

Professor Elizabeth S. Taylor organized the conference Writing Vietnam at which writers of fiction, memoir, poetry, journalism, and biography read from and discussed their works and experiences of the Vietnam War at Brown University on April 21-23, 1999. After the conference, STG, along with English Department student Alice Lovejoy, designed and created a website to disseminate the narratives, discussions, and other materials generated by the conference. The website contains a collection of audio recordings along with transcripts of each event. A photograph exhibit and an album of conference snapshots are also included on the website. The conference materials are supplemented by additional essays and the syllabus from Professor Taylor's creative writing course, "Writing Vietnam."

Project Details

XML Document Validation Service

One of the first web accessible XML validation services, the Validator was withdrawn in 2009.

Detailed information

This service validated XML document instances according to the February 1998 W3C XML 1.0 specification. It was based on an extensive custom-written XML validation engine available locally as a command-line utility (xmlparse). The C code written for this service forms the basis for the Open eBook Validator as well.

The Validator was used extensively, but had to be withdrawn when newer versions of XML rendered it obsolete.

Project Details

  • Status: Archived
  • People Involved: Richard Goerwitz (STG)
  • Departments Involved: STG (Computing and Information Services)
  • Type of Project: Tools development, Digital scholarly resources
  • Research Domains: Markup theories and technologies
  • Related Links:XML Validation Service Technical Report

Yiddish Sheet Music

A collection of sheet music with focus on the Yiddish-language musical stage from the 1880s through the 1940s, and including many photographs of composers and performers.

Project URL | Detailed information

Project Details

from today Conference

Conference on documentary work and new technology, March 15-17, 2000, Brown University

Project URL | Detailed information

from today, a three-day conference on documentary work and new technology, took place on March 15-17, 2000. Invited speakers ranged from radio, film and video producers, to historians and anthropologists. The conference included panels, workshops, and a film/video festival. The Website was produced by Sara Grady to aid the participants and to archive information about the main topics of the conference itself.

Project Details

  • Status: Completed
  • People Involved: Sara Grady (STG), David Reville (STG)
  • Departments Involved: STG (Computing and Information Services)
  • Type of Project: Events and outreach
  • Research Domains: New media theory
  • Funding: The conference received funding from a number of sources at Brown - Department of Modern Culture and Media, Scholarly Technology Group, Multimedia Lab, Computing and Information Services - and from the Rhode Island Historical Society
  • Project URL:http://www.stg.brown.edu/conferences/fromtoday/

prospect Website

E-journal of selected student writing from Brown's Creative Nonfiction courses.

Project URL | Detailed information

In 1999, Creative Nonfiction was a relatively new course at Brown in which students who show potential for writing to professional standards explore the genres of literary journalism, historical narrative, personal essay, and short performance pieces. Prof. Beth Taylor asked STG to design and produce a website to publish an anthology of works by students in creative nonfiction course, which is called prospect. The work published in prospect is selected by the faculty teaching Creative Nonfiction classes each semester.

In 2005, STG worked with Beth Taylor again, to streamline the process of adding new issues to prospect. As originally designed and implemented, the site was tediious to maintain: each issue had to be populated by hand. In this faculty grant project, STG developed a web based submission tool and rtf converter so that student papers could easily be added to the journal. The initial intent was to allow students to upload their own papers, but that proved to be impractical, so the journal is still maintained by staff, but using a more efficient system.

The CDS currently maintains and updates the site.

Project Details

  • Status: Completed
  • People Involved: Elli Mylonas (STG), Elizabeth S. Taylor (Faculty lead), Sara Grady (STG), Kerri Hicks (STG), David Reville (STG)
  • Departments Involved: English
  • Type of Project: Electronic publication, Tools development
  • Research Domains: Electronic publishing
  • Project URL:http://www.stg.brown.edu/projects/CreativeNonfiction/