Skip over navigation
Brown shield Brown shield Brown University Library Brown shield Brown shield Brown University Library Center for Digital Initiatives

1765-11-25

Sales of twenty four negroes; November 25, 1765
The returning Sally's first port of call on entering the Caribbean was Barbados. The Browns had posted several letters to the island offering Hopkins advice on where he might most profitably sell the enslaved Africans in his hold, but none of the letters seems to have reached him. Hopkins proceeded to Antigua where he sold what remained of his cargo. Most of the surviving captives were desperately ill and fetched very low prices at auction, as this undated document, recording the sale of twenty-four Africans off the Sally, confirms. Alexander Willock, the Antiguan merchant who handled the sale, later wrote to the Browns apologizing for the low prices.
Willock, Alexander to Nicholas Brown & Co.; November 25, 1765
The returning Sally's first port of call on entering the Caribbean was Barbados. The Browns had posted several letters to the island offering Hopkins advice on where he might most profitably sell the enslaved Africans in his hold, but none of the letters seems to have reached him. Hopkins proceeded to Antigua where he sold what remained of his cargo. Most of the surviving captives were desperately ill and fetched very low prices at auction, a fact acknowledged in this letter, dated November 25, 1765, which accompanied the account of Alexander Willock, an Antiguan slave trader who handled the sale of twenty-four captives. Willock apologized for the low prices, which he attributed to the slaves' "very Indifferent" quality, and assured the Browns that, if they ever wished to "try this Markett Again with good Slaves I should be able to give you Satisfaction."