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sales records

Sales of negroes; November 16, 1765
The returning Sally's first port of call on entering the Caribbean was Barbados. The Browns had posted several letters to the island offering Hopkins advice on where he might most profitably sell the enslaved Africans in his hold, but none of the letters seems to have reached him. Hopkins proceeded to Antigua where he sold what remained of his cargo. Most of the surviving captives were desperately ill and fetched very low prices at auction, a fact confirmed by this document, dated November 16, 1765, which records the sale of eleven Africans off the Sally. The sale, which was handled by an Antiguan merchant named Nathaniel Hardcastle, netted just £185.
Sales of twenty four negroes; November 25, 1765
The returning Sally's first port of call on entering the Caribbean was Barbados. The Browns had posted several letters to the island offering Hopkins advice on where he might most profitably sell the enslaved Africans in his hold, but none of the letters seems to have reached him. Hopkins proceeded to Antigua where he sold what remained of his cargo. Most of the surviving captives were desperately ill and fetched very low prices at auction, as this undated document, recording the sale of twenty-four Africans off the Sally, confirms. Alexander Willock, the Antiguan merchant who handled the sale, later wrote to the Browns apologizing for the low prices.
Sales record for the brig George in Surinam; August 13, 1770
The transatlantic slave trade was only one of the ways in which the Rhode Island was entangled with slavery. In addition to participating in the so-called "triangle trade," linking the West Indies, West Africa, and New England, Rhode Islanders conducted a robust bilateral trade with the plantation colonies of the Caribbean. Ships sailed south with a vast array of provisions, including candles, tobacco, tar, salt fish (the staple diet of African slaves), furniture, flour, and horses, which was exchanged chiefly for sugar and molasses, as well as for cotton, bills of exchange, and slaves. The Brown brothers played a particularly active role in the trade with Surinam, a Dutch colony on the coast of South America. The nature of the provisioning trade is illustrated in this document, dated August 13, 1770, which records all sales from a voyage to Surinam by the George, a Brown-owned brigantine.
Sales record for the brig Sally in Antigua; January 8, 1766
The returning Sally's first port of call on entering the Caribbean was Barbados. The Browns had posted several letters to the island offering Hopkins advice on where he might most profitably sell the enslaved Africans in his hold, but none of the letters seems to have reached him. Hopkins proceeded to Antigua where he sold what remained of his cargo. This document, which records some of Hopkins's transactions during his first month in Antigua, includes information about the sale of 35 survivors from the ship. Most are identified as "sick" and fetched extremely low prices, in some cases as little as £5 apiece. Only two of the captives are described as "primes slaves." They sold for £50 each.