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Whipple, Abraham

Articles; October 30, 1765

Articles, dated October 30, 1765, specifying the names, duties, and wages of the crew of the George, a brigantine owned by the Brown brothers, for a voyage from Providence to the Surinam, a Dutch colony on the coast of South America. The articles list Abraham Whipple as George's master, though by the time the ship sailed he had been reassigned to another Brown ship, the sloop Four Brothers, also bound for Surinam, leaving the George in the command of Nicholas Power. In their subsequent letter of instructions to Power (see document 16), the Browns directed him to rendezvous with Whipple in Surinam, to switch ships with him, and to proceed to Barbados in hopes of locating and assisting Esek Hopkins and the Sally, who were en route from Africa with a cargo of slaves.

Nicholas Brown & Co. to Whipple, Abraham, Hopkins, George, and Power, Nicholas; November 17, 1765

Letter from Nicholas Brown and Company to Abraham Whipple, George Hopkins, and Nicholas Power, three ship captains in the company's employ. The letter, dated November 15, 1765, relates the "Disagreeable account" the Browns had just received from Esek Hopkins, who had arrived in Antigua a month before. It includes details of the insurrection that the enslaved Africans had mounted during the return journey, after which the survivors were reportedly "so Despirited that Some Drowned them Selves Some Starved and others Sickened & Dyed."

Nicholas Brown & Co. to Whipple, Abraham; December 3, 1765

Letter, dated December 3, 1765, from Nicholas Brown and Company to Abraham Whipple, captain of the George, one of four Brown-owned ships trading in the West Indies at the time. The letter informs Whipple of the arrival of the Sally in Antigua and its various travails, and amends his orders accordingly.

Nicholas Brown & Co. to Whipple, Abraham; July 29, 1765

Letter, dated July 29, 1765, from Nicholas Brown and Company to Abraham Whipple, the captain of a Brown-owned ship, passing on recently arrived news from Esek Hopkins. On July 17, the Browns had belatedly received a letter from Hopkins, contradicting earlier reports that he and the Sally had been lost on the African coast. The original letter from Hopkins does not survive, but it placed Hopkins on the River Grande in mid-May with a cargo of 75 slaves. It also apparently reported heavy losses due to leakage from the rum barrels in the ship's hold.