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Library Course Guide for: LATIN AMERICAN LITERATURE IN DIALOGUE WITH FRANCE

Welcome to the Library Resource Guide for LATIN AMERICAN LITERATURE IN DIALOGUE WITH FRANCE

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CO0181_13 ()
Spain and the United States may have vied for economic power in Spanish America but, culturally, France has wielded significant influence. Spanish American writers, like many others, long considered Paris the capital of culture; and the countries of Spanish America, in turn, exerted their magnetism upon adventurers from France. This course explores the relationship between the cultural metropolis and the so-called periphery, and their figurations of each other in literature. It raises questions of intertextuality and, at the same time, asks how similar aesthetic and historical questions are articulated contemporaneously from both sites. Our trajectory begins in the mid-19th century, with French and Spanish American representations of the racial other, and then moves from the aesthetic project of Spanish American modernismo to surrealism and magical realism. Later topics include the mid-20th century idea of the “new” novel; the production and importation of theory; and contemporary women’s writing. Throughout, we ask: how are France and Spanish America configured in the cultural imagination of each other? And, what are the ethical and political dimensions of literary influence and appropriation?

Faculty:
Esther Whitfield (email)-- Information on Prof. Whitfield


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Image: La Tour Eiffel, vue prise du Dome Central. George Eastman House, Rochester, NY.



Image: Cesar Vallejo.



Image: Julio Cortazar in Paris.